13 DAYS

Historical Hysteria

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Starring: Kevin Costner, Bruce
Greenwood, Steven Culp,
Lucinda Jenney, & Peter White

Genre: Historical Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 138 minutes

Distributor: New Line Cinema

Director: Roger Donaldson

Executive Producer: Thomas A. Bliss, Michael De
Luca & Ilona Herzberg

Producer: Peter O. Almond, Armyan
Bernstein, Kevin Costner, &
Kevin O’Donnell

Writer: David Self

Address Comments To:

Robert Shaye, CEO
New Line Cinema
116 North Robertson Blvd.
Suite 200
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Phone: (310) 854-5811
Website: www.newline.com

Content:

(BB, Pa, C, LLL, V, A, D, M) Moral worldview with some pagan elements & a reference to God; 22 obscenities, 28 profanities & a few vulgarities; many intense situations, men in jets are fired upon but unharmed, man tries to dodge missiles, & plane explodes when hit with missile; no sex; no nudity; alcohol use; smoking; and, lying.

Summary:

Kevin Costner delves into the life of John F. Kennedy once again in 13 DAYS, but this time Costner plays JFK’s political advisor during the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962. Though this dramatic movie revolves around this highly political and historical event, viewers also get an intimate look at the relationship between the President and his brother, Bobby, but the story is marred by strong foul language.

Review:

Following the failed Bay of Pigs invasion of Castro’s Communist Cuba, President John F. Kennedy was faced with the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962. This 13-day event put America on the verge of World War III with the Soviet Union, another Communist tyranny. 13 DAYS focuses on the story behind this event with a personal look at the President, his relationship with brother Bobby and his relationship with a close political advisor, played by Kevin Costner.

The movie opens with a glimpse into Kenny O’Donnell’s (Costner’s) home, where he is ignoring his wife and their five children during breakfast by burying himself in the morning paper. On the wall, in the kitchen, are two phones – one black and one red. The red phone is symbolic of Kenny’s job as political advisor to President John F. Kennedy (played by Bruce Greenwood), who is also his childhood friend. This day, however, will not only test their friendship, but will also begin a period where any wrong decision they make could put his family, and the whole country, in danger.

When aerial pictures of Cuba reveal nuclear missile construction by the Soviet Union, the leaders of the United States are put on the horns of a dilemma – to fire and risk nuclear war, or to try and work out a solution with the Soviet government. Though his military advisors push for war, President Kennedy wants to avoid the conflict. Kenny advises him toward this as well, but it is John’s brother, Bobby (played by Steven Culp), who is shown as being a key player when it comes to the strategy of the U.S. Eventually, the President, his brother and Kenny are presented as a heroic team that prevents an international conflict.

Though the actual historical events may be different, 13 DAYS depicts the Cuban Missile Crisis without leaning too much on Hollywood drama. Especially notable was the personal relationship between the Kennedy brothers, enhanced by Steven Culp’s fine performance as Bobby. It is both this relationship and the dramatic moments that keep the audience interested in the rest of the script, especially the younger generation whose view of the Cuban Missile Crisis may be just another easily forgotten event in their dumbed-down, de-Christianized history books. While one should not rely on a Hollywood movie to learn about such an event, the dramatization can often lead to a perked interest.

Regrettably, however, 13 DAYS contains numerous obscenities and even more profanities. This strong foul language mars an otherwise well-acted movie that emphasizes the value of human life through its individuality.

In Brief:

In 13 DAYS, Kevin Costner delves into the life of John F. Kennedy once again. This time, however, Costner plays JFK’s personal political advisor, Kenny O’Donnell, during the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962. When aerial pictures of Cuba reveal nuclear missile construction by the Soviet Union, a Communist tyranny, President Kennedy, O'Donnell and Bobby Kennedy, the attorney general, try to avoid starting World War III. The movie portrays them as an heroic team that saves the day.

Though the actual historical events may be slightly different, 13 DAYS depicts the Cuban Missile Crisis without leaning too much on Hollywood drama. Especially notable was the personal relationship between the Kennedy brothers, enhanced by Steven Culp’s fine performance as Bobby Kennedy. It is both this relationship and the dramatic moments that keep the audience interested in the rest of the script, especially younger audience members whose view of the Cuban Missile Crisis may be just another easily forgotten event from their history books. Regrettably, 13 DAYS contains numerous obscenities and even more profanities. This strong foul language mars an otherwise well-acted movie that emphasizes the value of human life through its individuality