21

You Can’t Beat The House

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 28, 2008

Starring: Jim Sturgess, Kate Bosworth, Laurence Fishburne, and Kevin Spacey

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teens and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 118 minutes

Address Comments To:

Michael Lynton, Chairman/CEO
Amy Pascal, Chairman - Motion Picture Group
Sony Pictures Entertainment
(Columbia Pictures/TriStar/Screen Gems/Provident)
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000
Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(PaPa, H, B, Ho, LL, VV, SS, NN, A, D, M) Strong mixed pagan worldview with pagan, humanist and moral elements, plus a brief homosexual reference when two female co-eds kiss as a joke; three profanities and seven obscenities; characters are beaten strongly in the face in two instances; sex between main characters involving partial nudity, two co-eds kiss as joke and a joke about self-abuse; strippers in string bikinis showing rear female nudity, multiple examples of female cleavage, and upper male nudity; drinking alcohol in the context of casinos and clubs; smoking; and, smuggling money through airport security, I.D. deception, and stealing hotel items.

Summary:

21 is based on a true story of a group of college student geniuses who are able to use their math prowess to win at the blackjack tables in Las Vegas. Though well made, 21 has a mixed moral message with foul language, nudity and sexual content, so it demands extreme caution.

Review:

21 is based on a true story of a group of college student geniuses who are able to use their math prowess to win at blackjack in Las Vegas.

Ben Campbell (Jim Sturgess) is a top MIT student headed for Harvard Medical School, but finds that his chance of getting the needed scholarship is very slim. Enter math professor Mickey Rosa (Kevin Spacey), who trains Ben and a group of students to “count cards” in Las Vegas, earning all of them hundreds of thousands of dollars. “Counting cards” is the process where one adds all the cards that are dealt to know the probability of what’s going to come next from the deck.

Though counting cards is not illegal, the casinos do not approve of the strategy. Eventually, security consultant Cole Williams (Laurence Fishburne) begins to catch on to the students’ wiles. If caught, the consequence is a brutal beating in the casino basement.

21 has a mixed moral message. Ben ultimately doesn’t reach his goal of riches from Las Vegas, and there are clear negative consequences to his deceptions, but through a twist of plot, his actions turn out to help him. Further, Ben’s obsession with Vegas, along with all the trappings that sudden wealth can bring, leads him to lie to his mother and abandon his best friend and the student science competition they are doing together. Ben comes to regret his actions, and he does make those things right in the end. These actions are positive and commendable, but the movie is set against the backdrop of Vegas and the desire for wealth, sex and a “party” lifestyle. One scene in fact takes place in a strip club with dozens of shots of string bikini clad women. Also, Ben falls in love with one of his cohorts and, at the height of his seduction into the Vegas lifestyle, there is a sex scene with partial nudity between them. While Ben technically isn’t cheating by counting cards, there is much deception involved, such as false identities, smuggling cash through airport security, and disguises.

Regrettably, the characters exhibit essentially a pagan worldview. God is not mentioned except in reference to one joke. This secular worldview and the negative elements of foul language and deception keeps this movie from being a strong and effective morality tale of negative consequences following negative actions. As the apostle Paul wrote in Galatians 6:7, “A man reaps what he sows.”

The movie itself is well made. The story is paced nicely, and the script creates very strong characters. The plot itself has a number of twists and turns, along with a surprise ending. The acting is the strongest element of the movie, with exceptional performances from Jim Sturgess as Ben Campbell and Kevin Spacey as the morally bankrupt professor. Josh Gad as the genius best friend is terrific and has the movie’s funniest lines. 21 is a tale told well that comes close to delivering a strong moral message marred by negative elements.

In Brief:

21 is based on a true story about a math genius. Led by their morally bankrupt professor, Ben Campbell and his college genius friends are able to use their math prowess to win at the blackjack tables in Las Vegas. Casino security consultant Cole Williams begins to catch on to the students’ wiles, and their winning scheme begins to unravel.

Though well made, 21 has a mixed moral message. Ben ultimately doesn’t reach his goal of riches from Las Vegas, and there are clear negative consequences to his deceptions. Even so, through a plot twist, his actions turn out to help him. Also, Ben’s obsession with Vegas, including the trappings of sudden wealth, leads him to lie to his mother and abandon his best friend and their science competition. Ben comes to regret his actions and makes those things right in the end. This is positive and commendable, but the movie is set against the backdrop of Vegas and the desire for wealth, sex and a “party” lifestyle. While Ben technically isn’t cheating by counting cards, there is much deception involved, such as false identities, smuggling cash through airport security, and disguises.