BABY MAMA

Liberal Sensibilities

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 25, 2008

Starring: Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Greg
Kinnear, Steve Martin,
Sigourney Weaver, Dax Shepard,
Romany Malco, Maura Tierney,
and Holland Taylor

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 96 minutes

Distributor: Universal Pictures/General
Electric

Director: Michael McCullers

Executive Producer: Jill Messick, Louise E. Rosner
and Ryan Kavanaugh

Producer: Lorne Michaels and John
Goldwyn

Writer: Michael McCullers

Address Comments To:

Jeffrey R. Immelt, Chairman/CEO, General Electric
Jeff Zucker, President/CEO, NBC Universal Entertainment
Ron Meyer, President/COO, Universal Studios
Marc Shmuger, Chairman
David Linde, Co-Chairman
Universal Pictures
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(RoRo, FeFe, LLL, S, A, DD, M) Strong liberal Romantic worldview with strong feminist ideology where women can have babies and not get married, but they can make it on their own with or without a male, but the most supportive fathers are liberal compassionate ones who don’t really want to get married right away but are extremely supportive of the single working mother; 14 obscenities, 12 light profanities (usually My God), woman gets sick into toilet, some crudities; no violence; implied fornication when unmarried woman stays overnight at man’s place and some light references to procedures regarding artificial insemination, surrogate mothering and a common law marriage; no nudity; alcohol use; brief smoking references and a drug reference; and, lying and deceit.

Summary:

In BABY MAMA, a 37-uear-old professional career woman hires a blue-collar woman to be the surrogate mother for her child, leading to a comic battle of wills. Better writing would help make BABY MAMA funnier, but the movie also suffers from a liberal feminist perspective on making babies and families.

Review:

BABY MAMA is the first Hillary Clinton movie of the 21st Century. Thus, this movie conforms to the kind of libertine America that socialists want to establish – one where career women are free to have babies, with or without a husband.

The movie stars SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE alumnus Tina Fey as Kate Holbrook, vice president of a health foods chain owned by Steve Martin’s guru boss Barry. At 37, Kate discovers a deep yearning to have a baby, but has no immediate prospects of landing a husband. So, Kate decides to get artificially inseminated. Sadly, Kate learns she has little chance of getting pregnant.

As a last resort, Kate turns to a surrogate mother agency. The agency pairs Kate with Angie (played by Amy Poehler, also from SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE), a blue-collar young woman living with her common-law husband, Carl, who’s permanently unemployed. Angie agrees to have Kate’s baby, but several weeks later, she has a fight with Carl and turns up on Kate’s doorstep. A comic battle of wills ensues as super-organized Kate lays down strict rules of prenatal parenting for free-spirited Angie.

Considering the talent behind this movie, BABY MAMA should be funnier than it is. The characters are too stereotypical, and too much of the comedy relies on one-liners. Consequently, none of the performers really stand out, except perhaps for Steve Martin, who does a goofy turn as the heroine’s superficial, New Agey boss. Even his performance sometimes relies on familiar shtick rather than real characterization.

A bigger problem is the movie’s liberal sensibility, which seems to stem from a Romantic, feminist worldview. Thus, in the world of BABY MAMA, it is natural for unmarried women to get pregnant and it is natural for career women to get along on their own with or without a man, especially a husband. Please forgive us if we don’t accept this liberal utopian vision of the human condition. All babies deserve the love of a real mother and a real father, a real family united together under God through Jesus Christ, who is Lord of all (Acts 10:36 and Colossians 2:10).

In Brief:

BABY MAMA stars Tina Fey as Kate, vice president of a health foods chain. At 37, Kate discovers a yearning to have a baby, but has no prospects of landing a husband. So, she decides to get artificially inseminated. When Kate learns she has little chance of getting pregnant, she turns to a surrogate mother agency. The agency pairs Kate with Angie (played by Amy Poehler), a blue-collar young woman living with her permanently unemployed common-law husband, Carl. Angie agrees to have Kate’s baby, but she has a fight with Carl and turns up on Kate’s doorstep. A comic battle of wills ensues as super-organized Kate lays down strict rules of prenatal parenting for free-spirited Angie.

Considering the talent behind this movie, BABY MAMA should be funnier. The characters are too stereotypical, and too much of the comedy relies on one-liners. A bigger problem is the movie’s liberal sensibility, which stems from a Romantic, feminist worldview. Thus, in the world of BABY MAMA, it is okay for unmarried women to get pregnant and for career women to get along on their own with or without a man, especially a husband.