BLUE CHIPS

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 18, 1994

Starring: Nick Nolte, Mary McDonnell,
J.T. Walsh, Anfernee Hardaway,
& Shaquille O'Neal

Genre: Drama

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 103 minutes

Distributor: Paramount Pictures

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Ron Shelton

Address Comments To:

Content:

(H, LLL, V, Ab, M, B) Humanist worldview where ethics are relative and rule violations only count when the violator is caught; 77 obscenities, 55 profanities & several vulgarities; violent emotional & verbal outbursts by basketball coach; mild mockery of church-going & denominations; point-shaving & player pay-offs; biblical principals of truth & integrity are exhibited by film's end, but no strong consequences are felt for dishonesty & rule violations.

Summary:

Big-college basketball is on trial as the movie BLUE CHIPS bursts onto the screen with a profanity-filled tirade from Western University basketball coach Pete Bell (played by Nick Nolte) trying to psych-up his mediocre team and pull out a win to avoid a first-ever losing season. BLUE CHIPS is a moral and film failure and not recommended for family viewing. If you're looking for a good basketball movie, rent HOOSIERS.

Review:

Big-college basketball is on trial as the movie BLUE CHIPS bursts onto the screen with a profanity-filled tirade from Western University basketball coach Pete Bell (played by Nick Nolte) trying to psych-up his mediocre team and pull out a win to avoid a first-ever losing season. The answer to Pete's woes is recruitment, but successful recruiting costs money--under the table money, that is--and Coach Pete flatly refuses to cheat. Regrettably, Pete's selective ethics are not quite as strong as his triple threat of freshman recruiting prospects. Faced with losing three new recruits, Pete gives-in and sells-out to the underhanded and well-financed alumni. Realizing he has become the very thing he despises, Pete offers a soul-stirring confession to the media and then quits. How moving, yet hypocritical. The characters suffer no real consequences for their cheating, and two of the star recruits are even shown trading high-fives as they quit school and head for the NBA.

Acting performances by Nolte and the others are quite good but cannot make up for the moral failings and overabundance of foul language. The basketball game-action sequences are so-so at best. BLUE CHIPS is a failure and not recommended for family viewing. If you're looking for a good basketball movie, rent HOOSIERS. If it is highlights you want, tune in ESPN.

In Brief: