CAFE AU LAIT

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 19, 1994

Starring: Julie Mauduech, Hubert Kounde,
Mathieu Kassovitz, Vincent
Cassel, Tadek Lokcinski, &
Jany Holt

Genre: Romantic comedy

Audience: Adults and teens

Rating: NR

Runtime: 94 minutes

Distributor: New Yorker Films

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Mathieu Kassovitz

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Content:

(H, PC, LLL, V, SS, NN) Secular humanism with politically correct views; 74 obscenities, 2 profanities, 4 obscene gestures, & some racial & anti-Semitic slurs; mild violence; fornication; and, partial female nudity.

Summary:

Set in Paris, CAFE AU LAIT is an unusual but fast-paced romantic comedy about a woman with two lovers, either of which may have fathered the child she is expecting. The film's primary message, working out differences to achieve racial harmony through love, dialogue and cooperation, is far outweighed by its lack of a biblical outlook on sin, especially this "menage a trois," and by its abundance of vulgar language.

Review:

CAFE AU LAIT is a romantic comedy set in Paris. First-time director Mathieu Kassovitz also stars as Felix in this light-hearted French version of Spike Lee's SHE'S GOTTA HAVE IT. Lola, a light-brown skinned university student from Martinique, does not know which of her two boyfriends is the father of her expected child: Felix, a young, Jewish white man who loves African-American culture, rap, basketball, and boxing; or, Jamal, a Moslem, African black law student and the son of well-to-do African diplomats. These two are reverse stereotypes and thus set the stage for several humorous scenes and comic dialogue. The film shows how the three resolve their differences and form their own household.

CAFE AU LAIT is, at times, witty and surprising. To the film's credit, Lola does not consider an abortion. Equally positive is that the problems of living in harmony with others are realistically portrayed. Although the theme of working out of racial harmony through dialogue is a worthy one, the issue of the irresponsible and sinful lifestyles which the three lead is not even considered. The lack of a biblical outlook on sin, especially this "menage a trois," and an abundance of vulgar language far outweigh the movie's wit and originality.

In Brief: