CATCH THAT KID

Too Much Heart

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 06, 2004

Starring: Kristen Stewart, Corbin Bleau,
Max Thieroit, Jennifer Beals,
Sam Robards, John Carroll
Lynch, and James Le Gros

Genre: Comedy/Caper Comedy

Audience: All ages

Rating: PG

Runtime: 93 minutes

Distributor: 20th Century Fox

Director: Bart Freundlich PRODUCER:
Andrew Lazar

Executive Producer:

Producer: Andrew Lazar EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Damien Saccani,
James Dodson, and Mikkel
Bondesen

Writer: Nikolaj Arcel, Hans Fabian
Wullenweber, and Erlend
Loe BASED ON THE DANISH FILM:
KLATRET_SEN

Address Comments To:

Peter Chernin, Chairman and CEO
The Fox Group
Tom Rothman and Jim Gianopulos, Chairmen
Fox Filmed Entertainment
20th Century Fox Film Corp.
A division of Fox, Inc. and News Corp.
10201 West Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 369-1000
Website: www.fox.com

Content:

(Ro, B, L, V, N, A, MM) Light Romantic worldview undercuts positive moral elements that extol family life and parents becoming involved with their children; two light obscenities, seven light exclamatory profanities, and 12-year-old sometimes says “Holy” without finishing it with an actual obscenity or vulgarity; some action violence such as tense climbing moments, zapping people with electric stick, and police chase kids on two go-karts through city streets and alleys; no sex scenes, but woman sits on man’s lap at desk while they kiss two or three times; cartoon character’s rear-end is exposed on TV; implied alcohol use at party; no smoking; and, stealing, lying, and recklessly risking lives are not appropriately rebuked.

GENRE: Comedy/Caper Comedy

Summary:

In CATCH THAT KID, a 12-year-old girl named Maddy and her two friends, Gus and Austin, try to rob a bank vault designed by her mother when her father has to have a costly operation because of a paralyzing mountain climbing accident. CATCH THAT KID is a family movie with a lot of heart, but it is a little too silly and unrealistic at times and fails to appropriately rebuke the stealing, lying, and risk-taking the characters must do to save Maddy’s father.

Review:

CATCH THAT KID is a family movie with a lot of heart, but it falls short in a couple important areas, not the least of which is an unsatisfying moral resolution to a plot problem at the end.

Young actress Kristen Stewart (PANIC ROOM) stars in the story as Maddy, a precocious 12-year-old girl who decides to rob a bank vault designed by her mother, Molly, when her father, Tom, has to have a costly operation because of a paralyzing mountain climbing accident. Like her father, Maddy is a thrill-seeker who likes to climb. To steal the money from the vault for the operation, Maddy uses her climbing skills and the skills of her friends, Gus, who works on go-karts at her father’s go-kart track, and Austin, who knows computers and film cameras. She has to secretly pretend to be both Gus and Austin’s girlfriend in order to get their help, however. The three kids easily get past the bank’s modern security system, also designed by Maddy’s mom, but there are other dangerous challenges lurking around the corner.

Although CATCH THAT KID extols intact families and parents who get involved with their children, it has other moral problems. For example, Maddy’s mother has to lie in order to help Maddy out at an important point at the end. Also, the children are never really punished for trying to rob a bank and risking their lives and the lives of other people. These problems perhaps stem from the movie’s worldview, which seems to be Romantic. Romanticism says that most (or all) people are good at heart and undermines morality and rigorous intellectual thought with emotion. Therefore, CATCH THAT KID deserves a caution for children age 7 to 13.

Most of the performers do a good job in CATCH THAT KID, but there’s a silly, stupid security guard at the bank who’s way over the top and, hence, unrealistic. Other situations are also unrealistic. As a result, some of the exciting moments in the movie are not as suspenseful or involving as they should have been. The fact that the young protagonists are doing bad things they shouldn’t be doing also undercuts the sympathy that the audience should feel toward them.

In Brief:

CATCH THAT KID is a family movie with a lot of heart, but it falls short in a couple important areas. Maddy is a precocious 12-year-old girl who decides to rob a bank vault designed by her mother when her father has to have a costly operation because of a paralyzing mountain climbing accident. Like her father, Maddy is a thrill-seeker who likes to climb. To steal from the vault, Maddy uses her climbing skills and the skills of her friends, Gus and Austin. Gus works on go-karts at her father’s go-kart track, and Austin knows computers and film cameras. The three easily get past the bank’s modern security system, but there are other dangerous challenges lurking around the corner.

Most of the performers do a good job, but some of the characters and situations are a little too silly and unrealistic. They undercut the suspense and audience sympathy. Although CATCH THAT KID extols intact families and parents and has little foul language or vulgarity, it fails to appropriately rebuke the stealing, lying, and risk-taking the characters must do to save Maddy’s father. Therefore, it deserves a caution for children age 7 to 13.