COLOR OF NIGHT

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 19, 1994

Starring: Bruce Willis, Jane March,
Scott Bakula, Ruben Blades,
Lesley Ann Warren, Brad
Dourif, Lance Hendriksen, &
Kevin J. O'Connor

Genre: Erotic thriller

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 118 minutes

Distributor: Buena Vista Pictures/Walt
Disney Company

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Matthew Chapman & Billy Ray

Address Comments To:

Content:

(H, LLL, VVV, SSS, NNN, D, M) Secular humanism; 61 obscenities, 18 profanities & 11 vulgarities; excessively graphic depiction of suicide by jumping from skyscraper (impact shown), & several graphic deaths -- 1 repeated stabbing, 1 character bleeds to death, woman's hands are nailed to a chair, off-screen torture (results shown), 1 man shot with nail gun & impaled to a wall, 1 man impaled through the head, & 1 man impaled through the shoulder; 2 graphic fornication scenes (cunnilingus & fellatio implied), implied fornication, 2 women kiss, & 2 sexual innuendoes; full frontal female nudity, full rear male nudity, partial female nudity, & man "moons" from a helicopter; prescription drug abuse implied & cigarette smoking; and, rattlesnake attack, car chase and destruction of property.

Summary:

In THE COLOR OF NIGHT, Bruce Willis portrays Bill Capa, a psychologist who becomes embroiled in a murder mystery. Billed as an "erotic thriller," this movie is neither. Aside from the overwhelmingly offensive content, the movie is poorly written, poorly acted, poorly designed, badly directed, and unbelievable in almost every respect.

Review:

In THE COLOR OF NIGHT, Bruce Willis portrays Dr. Bill Capa, a psychologist who travels from New York to Los Angeles to visit a friend and colleague after a patient commits suicide in front of him. When his friend turns up dead, Capa takes over his friend's therapy group in which one of the members is the suspected killer. At the same time, he meets a mysterious stranger, begins a torrid sexual relationship, becomes obsessed with her, and falls in love. Suffice to say that the rest of the plot is sacrificed in favor of a lot of gore, sex and a restriction of only 120 minutes.

Billed as an "erotic thriller," COLOR OF NIGHT is neither. There is non-stop foul language, graphic sex and violence, but as any moviegoer will testify: sex and violence do not equal Eros and suspense. This is a feeble story with caricatures instead of characters and the mistaken notion that a lot of flesh equals eroticism. Contrary to a lot of publicity hype, there is absolutely no chemistry between Willis and his co-star, Jane March, probably because no time is given to building a relationship. Aside from the overwhelmingly offensive content, the movie is poorly written, poorly acted, poorly designed, badly directed, and unbelievable in almost every respect.

In Brief: