COLOUR ME KUBRICK: A TRUE...ISH STORY Add To My Top 10

If You Ever Meet a Celebrity, Watch Your Wallet!

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 23, 2007

Distributor: Magnolia Pictures

Director: Brian Cook

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Michael Fitzgerald and Brian Cook

Writer: Anthony Frewin

Address Comments To:

Bill Banowski, CEO
Magnolia Pictures
1614 West 5th St.
Austin, TX 78703
Eamon Bowles, President
Magnolia Pictures
43 West 27th St., 7th Floor
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 924-6701
Fax: (212) 924-6742
Website: www.magpictures.com
Email: info@ magpictures.com

Content:

(B, HoHo, LLL, V, S, N, AA, DD, MM) Light, implied moral worldview exposing the deceitfulness of a famous con man and warning people about being gullible, having misplaced compassion and about becoming obsessed with fame, fortune and celebrity to the point of hurting themselves and hurting other people, plus strong, sometimes crude homosexual references; at least 39 obscenities (mostly "f" words), three strong profanities, one light profanity; light violence such as angry man chases another man and sick man collapses; brief and implied sexual references such as protagonist is a homosexual who often has an effeminate accent, implied homosexuality and some crude sexual references; brief upper male nudity; alcohol use and drunkenness; smoking and marijuana use; and, lying, deceit, fraud, stealing, and con man poses as a famous reclusive celebrity.

Summary:

COLOR ME KUBRICK is a British comedy inspired by a true story about a homosexual con man who stole money, free drinks, dinners, and sexual favors from people by posing as acclaimed film director Stanley Kubrick. John Malkovich is brilliantly crazy as the con man in this often hilarious movie, but the flick contains some crude sexual references and lots of strong foul language.

Review:

COLOR ME KUBRICK is a British comedy inspired by a true story about a homosexual con man who takes money, free drinks, dinners, and sexual favors by posing as acclaimed film director Stanley Kubrick. Since Kubrick was such a recluse, con man Alan Conway is able to pose as Kubrick with impunity. "I shaved off my beard off," he drunkenly explains to one of his rich victims. In addition to rich victims, Alan bums drinks and cigarettes off young artists and homosexuals.

Then, when he's about to be put in jail by the police, Alan acts as if he has started to really believe he's Stanley Kubrick, so he's placed in a mental hospital. There, he cons the head psychiatrist to believe that he never benefited financially by pretending to be Stanley Kubrick. Of course, most of Alan's victims don't want to testify against him because they are so embarrassed about being conned by him. And, the government starts to pay for Alan's room, board and treatment at two mental institutions, including a ritzy clinic where celebrities go for rehab. The movie ends with Alan happily relaxing in the hot tub at the posh rehab center, on the government dole!

COLOR ME KUBRICK is a hilarious yet ultimately sad story about people's obsession with fame, fortune and celebrity. Their obsession blinds them to Alan's deceit until it's too late. The movie also pokes fun at psychiatry and the liberal British government's ineffectual ways of dealing with crime, welfare and the mentally ill. Adding to the comedy are many very clever musical references to Stanley Kubrick's movies. If you know the musical references, you will be laughing even more. In fact, COLOR ME KUBRICK was made by two men who actually worked with Stanley Kubrick on several movies.

John Malkovich is brilliantly crazy and inspired as Alan Conway. He dons different accents, including a Southern accent and a thick New York Jewish accent…whatever it takes to fool the people he meets.

In the press notes for this movie, one actor admits to actually meeting Alan Conway in Turkey.

"The hotel manager came to see me and said, 'I would like to introduce you to Stanley Kubrick.' You can't say no to that! And so we met. Conway came up to me and said, 'You're Jim Davidson, the actor, right?' I was so highly flattered to learn that Kubrick knew me! Tricking me was as easy as that! He was rather convincing in the role. I told him what I admired in FULL METAL JACKET while asking him questions; he always answered somewhat vaguely, with a somewhat haughty attitude. No one would have permitted themselves to say to him, 'Be more precise, Stanley' and even less doubt his very identity! Looking back on it all, it all seems utterly crazy!"

There are some homosexual references in COLOR ME KUBRICK. It also contains plenty of foul language and some substance abuse. Finally, the moral lessons imparted by the movie are more implied than spelled out explicitly. Thus, some, if not many, viewers may come to erroneous conclusions and even try to fool gullible people like Alan Conway did.

Consequently, MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution about watching this movie.

In Brief:

COLOR ME KUBRICK is a British comedy inspired by a true story about a homosexual con man who stole money, free drinks, dinners, and sexual favors by posing as acclaimed film director Stanley Kubrick. Since Kubrick was a recluse, Alan Conway was able to pose as Kubrick. "I shaved off my beard off," he drunkenly explains to one of his rich victims. In addition to rich victims, Alan bums drinks and cigarettes off young artists and homosexuals. The police catch him, but he cleverly slips away by pretending to be mentally ill. This ploy earns him a stint at a ritzy psychiatric clinic for celebrities, all on the government dole!

COLOR ME KUBRICK is a hilarious yet ultimately sad story about people's obsession with fame, fortune and celebrity. It also pokes fun at psychiatry and the liberal British government's ineffectual ways of dealing with crime, welfare and the mentally ill. John Malkovich is brilliantly crazy as Alan. He easily dons different accents and goofy schemes. The movie contains some sexual references and strong foul language, so extreme caution is advised. The movie's moral lessons are more implied than spelled out explicitly.