COVER Add To My Top 10

Homosexual Encounters on the “Down Low”

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 22, 2008

Starring: Aunjaune Ellis, Raz Adoti, Leon, Lou Gossett Jr., Paula Jai Parker, Clifton Davis, Patti Labelle, and Vivica Fox

Genre: Thriller

Audience: Adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 98 minutes

Address Comments To:

George Shamieh, CEO
American Cinema International
14242 Ventura Blvd., Suite 202
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
Phone: (818) 907-8700
Fax: (818) 907-8719
Website: www.aci-americancinema.com
Email: [email protected]

Content:

(PaPaPa, HoHoHo, C, B, AbAb, FRFR, RoRo, FeFe, Pa, L, V, SS, NN, AA, D, M) Very strong mixed pagan worldview with very strong homosexual content, some Christian and moral content and some warped Christian and biblical elements where some Christian characters behaved harshly toward those engaging in homosexuality without trying to bring them to salvation and some Christian characters were too apathetic about the issue, plus some strong Romantic and feminist elements; three obscenities and profanities; several violent scenes where a gun is present and gun is fired in one scene; some bed scenes, not graphic, plus, however, two men naked in a shower caress each other and some verbal homosexual encounters depicted; rear and upper male nudity in homosexual shower scene; several scenes where alcohol is consumed or someone is drunk; some smoking but no illegal drug references; and, some lying.

Summary:

In COVER, a church-going woman finds herself the prime suspect for a murder case after discovering that her husband has been actively engaging in homosexual affairs. COVER a very strong mixed pagan worldview with very strong homosexual references and some Christian characters with warped views of biblical teachings on homosexuality.

Review:

COVER begins with the press peppering a lawyer (Clifton Davis) with questions concerning a recent murder case in which his client, Valerie Maas (Aunjaune Ellis), is the prime suspect. The suspect, lawyer, and security entourage fight through the sea of reporters to find their destination in a small, dark interrogating room. And this is where the story begins to unfold.

“I must be allowed to tell everything. . . before I was accused of murder, before my family was ripped apart,” says a numb, unmovable Valarie Maas. She is undoubtedly convinced of her innocence, it is her involvement in the murder that remains unclear. It is this foggy area of the facts that have her as the prime suspect for murder. After some time of intense coaxing and threats, she tells all. Through a series of flashback sequences, the audience is allowed into the backstory of a murder case with surprises at every turn.

As far as the movie’s content is concerned, it desecrates the biblical definition of marriage. This modern day product of Babylon fosters and inflicts carnal confusion on its viewers, which could inflict a generation upon a wide release of this movie. The action causes every woman, especially African American women, to question the sexual orientation and lifestyle of the man they trust and call “husband.” Bill Duke has created a movie that normalizes a life of the “down low” and uses the movie as a nationwide announcement saying, “Most men deal with this.... It’s ok.” He, at least, presents the reality of the dangers that face a family with a husband in this lifestyle. The movie’s only redeeming value is that he is truthful about the effects of this lifestyle on a wife, children, relatives, and friends.

In addition, this low-budget independent movie constantly shows evidence of monetary restraints and skill limitations. The lighting throughout is less than desirable. The editing techniques are weak. Editing wholes exist in cutaway shots and continuity. The credit design is altogether awful, which only tips the viewer before the very first scene that the movie will be less than cinematically pleasing.

COVER has a very strong mixed pagan worldview with very strong homosexual references. Also, Christian characters act in unbiblical ways, with some being too harsh toward men engaged in the homosexual lifestyle and some being too apathetic. There is also an offensive homosexual encounter of two naked men caressing each other in a shower.

In Brief:

COVER begins with the press peppering a lawyer with questions concerning a recent murder case in which his client, Valerie Maas, is the prime suspect. “I must be allowed to tell everything…before I was accused of murder, before my family was ripped apart,” says a numb, unmovable Valarie Maas. She is undoubtedly convinced of her innocence, but her involvement in the murder that remains unclear. It is this foggy area of the facts that have her as the prime suspect for murder. After some time of intense coaxing and threats, she tells all. Through a series of flashback sequences, viewers learn that the meat of the case involves Valerie’s discovery of her husband’s secret homosexual lifestyle.

This low-budget independent movie constantly shows evidence of monetary restraints and skill limitations. The lighting throughout is less than desirable. The editing techniques are weak. The credit design is altogether awful, which only tips the viewer before the very first scene that the movie is less than cinematically pleasing. COVER has a very strong mixed pagan worldview with very strong homosexual references, including an offensive shower scene, and Christian characters acting in unbiblical ways.