CROSSING OVER Add To My Top 10

Politically Correct Drama

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 27, 2009

Starring: Harrison Ford, Ray Liotta, Ashley Judd, Jim Sturgess, Cliff Curtis, Alice Braga, Alice Eve, and Summer Bishil

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 113 minutes

Address Comments To:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein
Co-Chairmen
The Weinstein Company
345 Hudson Street, 13th Floor
New York, NY 10014
Phone: (646) 862-3400
Fax: (917) 368-7000
Website: www.weinsteinco.com

Content:

(HH, FRFR, PCPCPC, Ab, P, LLL, VVV, SSS, NNN,AA, DD, MMM) Strong humanist worldview mixed with strong false religion, very strong political correctness, and some anti-biblical atheism (which includes a self-professed atheist pretends to be a “religious worker” and pass as a canter at a synagogue) along with minor pro-American sentiments; at least 96 obscenities, seven profanities, multiple racial slurs; man and woman shot point blank to head with much blood, multiple murders during armed robbery, close-up of corpses; very strong sexual content includes multiple scenes of depicted and implied sexual adulterous relations; excessive sexual nudity includes brief shot of full frontal female nudity, upper female nudity, rear female nudity, rear male nudity, and upper male nudity; drinking of alcohol and drunkenness; smoking as well as use of marijuana; and, adultery, blackmail, lying, prostitution, illegal immigration, fraud, deception.

Summary:

CROSSING OVER is a mixed bag of characters all interconnected by illegal immigration in Los Angeles. The movie warrants much caution for its nudity, sexual content, foul language, and overt politically correct messages.

Review:

CROSSING OVER is a mixed bag of characters all interconnected by illegal immigration in Los Angeles.

Harrison Ford plays Max, a warm-hearted Immigration officer who tries to help a young mother connect with her son. An Australian actress-to-be trades sexual favors with an Immigration bureaucrat in hopes of getting a green card. A self-professed atheist pretends to be a “religious worker” and pass as a canter at a synagogue. An immigration lawyer wants to adopt a young girl from Africa while trying to help a young Bangladesan teenager detained for pro-terrorist statements. And, if that weren’t enough, an Iranian family becomes nationalized but not before the grown son kills his sister for “being a tramp,” and a Korean teenager turns to a life of crime on the eve of his nationalization ceremony.

Each of the characters which are in jeopardy are in the United States illegally. Some end up being deported. One dies. Some end up being citizens through deception and some through the legal process.

Like any “message movie,” the plot in CROSSING OVER takes over. Characters do things and say things to get the politically correct messages across. Because there are so many different stories and they often only cross peripherally, there is rarely enough time to get to know the characters or to care about them. The filmmakers have chosen message over entertainment, or even good storytelling, and have delivered a heavy-handed drama that is short of character and emotion and long on speeches and implausible plot points.

The politically correct messages cannot be missed. The various worldviews are presented of different characters ranging from atheism to Islam to humanist. Some characters are more sympathetic than others. Even though there are characters (the Korean family) who are glad to be nationalized, the nationalization ceremony is intercut with scenes and flashbacks of violence, and there is even a level of sarcasm as the judge says that America is a “welcoming” country. The only villain is “the system,” which requires that the characters follow the law.

There is much foul language, alcohol, illegal drugs, violence and scenes of nudity and sex. Much caution and discernment will need to be exercised if electing to see this movie.

In Brief:

CROSSING OVER is a mixed bag of characters in Los Angeles interconnected by illegal immigration. Harrison Ford plays Max, a warm-hearted Immigration officer who tries to help a young mother connect with her son. An Australian actress-to-be trades sexual favors to get a green card. An atheist pretends to be a “religious worker” and passes as a canter at a synagogue. An immigration lawyer wants to adopt a young girl from Africa while helping a young Bangladesh teenager detained for pro-terrorist statements. If that weren’t enough, an Iranian family becomes nationalized but not before the grown son kills his sister for “being a tramp.” And, a Korean teenager turns to crime on the eve of his nationalization ceremony.

Each character in jeopardy here is an illegal immigrant. Like any “message movie,” the plot takes over. Characters say and do things to get the politically correct messages across. There is rarely enough time to know the characters or care about them. The filmmakers have chosen message over entertainment and delivered a heavy-handed drama short on character and long on speeches. There is much foul language, violence, and excessive scenes of nudity and sex.