DANGEROUS GAME Add To My Top 10

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 19, 1993

Starring: Harvey Keitel, Madonna & James Russo

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults & older teens

Rating: R

Runtime: Approximately 115 minutes

Distributor: Metro Goldwyn Mayer/ A Maverick Production

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Nicholas St. John

Address Comments To:

Content:

(H, Ab, A/D, LLL, M, NN, SSS, VV) Humanism; at least 50 obscenities & 10 profanities; several references to God not existing & unable to do anything if He does; numerous scenes with alcohol drinking; murder at end (we see the man shoot his victim, but don't see the victim); scenes with partial male & partial female nudity; graphic sex shown in several scenes (adulterous relationships); and, violence in man striking woman several times.

Summary:

DANGEROUS GAME is a "movie within a movie" and explores what happens when art becomes life for a film director. On and off screen, the players exhibit despair in their search for satisfaction and meaning in life since they search in all the wrong places of drugs, sex and alcohol, when ultimately, only God can bring satisfaction.

Review:

The film DANGEROUS GAME is a "movie within a movie" and explores what happens when art becomes life for a film director. Harvey Keitel plays Director Eddie Israel. He is obsessed with his film MOTHER OF MIRRORS and forces the celluloid fantasy into the realm of reality with tragic results. Increasingly, the director and the actors become unhinged as they walk a razor-sharp tightrope between the drama behind the scenes and the one before the cameras. The plot of the movie story is the violent break-up of an upper-middle class couple, played by Madonna and James Russo. Even as they play the couple swept up in a torrent of rage and abuse, they begin a dangerous affair. The drama unfolds as the director drives the actors into emotional turmoil to get the performances he wants. Franky (James Russo) is strung-out on alcohol and drugs most the time and takes his frustrations out on his wife. The result is constant abuse, and in the end, Franky holds a gun to her head and shoots her.

What struck the reviewer in this sordid production with all its graphics and explicit immorality was the despair of the players--on and off the screen. They each searched for something to satisfy them: in drugs, alcohol and sex; however, only God can fill the vacuum within each person's heart. Everything else is a dead-end.

In Brief: