DELGO Add To My Top 10

Overcoming Hatred Through Forgiveness

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 12, 2008

Address Comments To:

Mark Borde, Mike Doban and Susan Jackson
Co-Presidents
Freestyle Releasing
24995 Pacific Coast Highway, Suite A-103
Malibu, CA 90265
Phone: (310) 456-2332
Fax: (310) 456-7919
Website: www.freestylereleasing.com
Email: [email protected]

Content:

(PaPa, C, B, VV, MM) Strong New Age, slightly mixed pagan worldview in the STAR WARS vein, with light redemptive, moral elements of forgiving enemies and fighting evildoers; no foul language; fantasy violence includes battle scenes involving sword play, villages burned, offscreen death of father seen by young boy, character stabbed, character falls to death, wings cut off character, though offscreen; no sexual content; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking or drug use; and, lying, deception, revenge.

Summary:

DELGO is an animated fantasy story of Delgo, a reckless Lockni teenager who forms a friendship with the princess of his people’s enemy, Princess Kyla of the Nohrin tribe. The movie is competently made, and the movie’s message is to forgive your enemies, but this is mixed with some New Age pagan elements in the STAR WARS vein.

Review:

DELGO is an animated fantasy story of Delgo, a reckless Lockni teenager who forms a friendship with the princess of his people’s enemy, Princess Kyla of the Nohrin tribe. As their friendship grows, the prejudice and animosity between the two groups increase until war is at hand. Behind the scenes, however, is the banished Empress who attempts to use the two tribe’s hatred for each other to become ruler of them both.

When Delgo and his faint-hearted friend Filo are falsely imprisoned, they must put aside their differences with Bogardus, a Nohrin warrior and together stop the evil Empress before the war escalates. Together, they learn to forgive one another and to lose their prejudices.

DELGO is an independently produced CGI animated feature, which is very rare. The art direction is beautiful and the scenes well lit and well designed. The characters are not overly attractive, however. Also, despite a well-known talent roster, the voices don’t bring the characters to life. The animation is very well done, though the camera works is rather standard and not very cinematic. The musical theme over end credits is full and worthy of a feature film, but the score during the movie is pedestrian and more like an animated television series. However, as a first independent movie, it is worthwhile.

The voices don’t bring much to the characters, though Eric Idle as the dim-witted servant is a standout. The story drags a bit because there is much backstory and history that needs to be understood to fully follow the story. The movie owes much to the STAR WARS trilogies as a young group of mystical people follow an “ancient religion” that involves New Age style mind control of objects. And, as in Star Wars, the main character is learning from a master how to levitate rocks and objects that come in handy when its time to save the princess.

There is no foul language nor other objectionable content, though there is quite a bit of violence. This is a movie that is not for very young children as there is killing, battles and shots of dead soldiers. It’s more like a live action fantasy, appropriate for older children.

The worldview has a positive message of forgiving enemies and learning to live together. However, there is a strong pagan New Age message as the Delgo learns to “let go” and move the magical stones with his mind. While there is talk of forgiving enemies, there is no discussion of justice for the wrongs that each tribe committed to the other, especially how the Nohrins massacred many of the Lockni.

With media-wise discernment, this movie may appeal to fans of fantasy, but is not for younger children.

In Brief:

DELGO is an animated fantasy story of Delgo, a reckless Lockni teenager who forms a friendship with the princess of his people’s enemy, Princess Kyla of the Nohrin tribe. As their friendship grows, the prejudice and animosity between the two groups increase until war is at hand. Behind the scenes, a banished Empress tries to use the two tribes’ hatred to become ruler of them both. Delgo and his faint-hearted friend Filo must put aside their differences with Bogardus, a Nohrin warrior, to stop the evil Empress.

The art direction of DELGO is beautiful and the scenes well lit and designed. The characters are not really attractive, however. Despite a well-known talent roster, the voices don’t bring them to life. There is no foul language, but there is quite a bit of violence, including killing, battles and shots of dead soldiers. The worldview has a positive message of forgiving enemies and learning to live together. However, there is a strong pagan New Age message as Delgo learns to move magical stones with his mind. With discernment, this movie may appeal to older fantasy fans, but is not for younger children.