DOA: DEAD OR ALIVE Add To My Top 10

Bikini Ninja Nonsense

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 15, 2007

Starring: Devon Aoki, Eric Roberts, Jaime Pressly, Kevin Nash, Robin Shou, Natassia Malthe, Holly Vance, Sarah Carter, and Matthew Marsden

Genre: Action Thriller

Audience: Older children and adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 87 minutes

Address Comments To:

Bob Weinstein and Harvey Weinstein
Co-Chairmen
Dimension Films
The Weinstein Company
345 Hudson Street, 13th Floor
New York, NY 10014
Phone: (646) 862-3400
Fax: (917) 368-7000
Website: www.weinsteinco.com

Content:

(PaPa, Ro, Ho, LL, VVV, S, NN, DD, MM) Strong pagan worldview with light Romantic elements with “good” kung fu fighters vs bad ninjas and a villain out to sell dangerous powers to bad people around the world, some supposedly “good” fighters enter fight to win prizes and steal money, plus some homosexual allusions between two women, which are denied; 10 obscenities, one strong profanity and five light profanities; loads of very strong slow motion choreographed fighting, much of it by women in bikinis, underwear or something else small; implied fornication, references to lesbian homosexuality but woman denies it and some sex related jokes and comments but no depicted sexual activity; mostly obscured upper and rear female nudity, plus women spend much time in tiny outfits and camera often gets close up; alcohol use; some drug-like material injected into contestants; and assorted issues of theft, dishonesty, kidnapping.

Summary:

DOA: DEAD OR ALIVE is a Kung-Fu fighting video game turned into a movie focused all to closely on bikini clad fighters trouncing hefty male contestants as well as armies of ninjas. Christian parents should just say “no” to any child wishing to see this movie.

Review:

DOA: DEAD OR ALIVE is a Kung-Fu fighting video game turned into a movie. It focuses all too closely on bikini clad fighters trouncing hefty male contestants as well as armies of ninjas. The movie follows the game so closely it opens with a series of events presented as if you were selecting on a computer or game console which players you wanted to fight with in the game. Each of the vignettes that demonstrate how violent the lead women are is followed by a set of glamour shots and a name plate presentation much like a game itself, then it’s off to the secret island for the big single elimination $10 million contest.

The contest turns out to be a front for using the contestants to design armies of fighters with the best fighting skills available on earth. After dispatching several huge male contestants, the female winners wind up joining forces to save the earth (and a few not so huge male friends). The fighting is frequent but looks more like a dance routine than real combat. Not a drop of blood is spilled as armies of ninjas lose in sword fights to the buxom babes. While this may be better than 300 where blood splatters by the gallons full, killing hundreds of opponents (even bloodlessly) is not a healthy use of time. DOA also contains some foul language, sexual allusions and brief partial nudity.

The appeal of a movie like this is to the boys that play the video game and to those who like to see girls in bikinis fighting. This should hold no appeal for anyone who claims Jesus Christ as Lord of their life, including teenage and pre-teenage boys and girls. Christian parents should just say “no” to any child wishing to see this movie. If you would not buy Jesus a ticket to this movie, you should not buy one for your child. Take your children to see NANCY DREW or RATATOUILLE instead.

In Brief:

DOA: DEAD OR ALIVE is a Kung-Fu fighting video game turned into a movie. It focuses all too closely on bikini clad women fighters trouncing hefty male contestants as well as armies of ninjas. The movie follows the game so closely that it opens with a series of events presented as if viewers were selecting which players they want to fight in a game. Each of the vignettes demonstrating how violent the lead women are is followed by a set of glamour shots and a nameplate presentation like a game itself. Then it’s off to a secret island for the big single elimination, $10 million contest.

The fighting in DOA is frequent but looks more like a dance routine than real combat. Not a drop of blood is spilled as armies of ninjas lose in sword fights to the buxom babes. While this may be better than the movie 300, where blood splatters by the gallons full, killing hundreds of opponents (even bloodlessly) is not a healthy use of time. DOA also contains some foul language, sexual allusions and partial nudity. This should hold no appeal for media-wise pre-teenage boys and girls.