DOOMSDAY

Gruesome Apocalyptic Violence

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 14, 2008

Starring: Rhona Mitra, Bob Hoskins, Malcolm McDowell, Adrian Lester, David O’Hara, Craig Conway, and Alexander Siddig,

Genre: Science Fiction

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 105 minutes

Address Comments To:

James Schamus, President
Focus Features/Rogue Pictures
A Division of NBC Universal and General Electric
65 Bleecker St., 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10012
Phone: (212) 539-4000
Fax: (212) 539-4099
Website: www.focusfeatures.com

Content:

(PaPa, HH, EV, B, Acap, LLL, VVV, S, NN, A, D, M) Strong, somewhat mixed pagan worldview with strong humanist nihilistic elements from villains, including one who mentions the illogical evolutionary theories of “natural selection” and “survival of the fittest,” and heroine defeats and foils bad guys, plus some anti-capitalist content since one villain appears to be a devious rich businessman and another villain has turned away from modern society to form his own feudal tyranny in Scotland; at least 77 mostly strong obscenities, three strong profanities, one light profanity, and two or three British obscenities; extremely graphic violence with blood and gore splattering includes many deaths, a cannibalism sequence, many decapitations, bodies smashed by objects and moving vehicles, and gruesome scenes of a deadly virus which causes bloody boils and vomiting; no depicted sex but threats of rape, implied sadomasochism as minor character apparently enjoys pain and being tied up, woman shown taking a bath, and two semi-nude women dance provocatively on outdoor makeshift stage as does an “emcee” who comes on stage; images of rear female nudity in dancing, shots of upper female nudity as a woman takes a bath and upper male nudity as one villain and some of his cohorts wear no shirt; no depicted alcohol use but woman asks for a drink; smoking; and, political corruption, cruelty and tyranny.

Summary:

DOOMSDAY is an apocalyptic science fiction movie from Scotland about a secret mission to a quarantined Scotland to find out why there are still survivors there 20 years after a deadly virus began. The silly story is action packed, but it has extremely graphic, gratuitous violence and gobs of obscenities, and God and religion are left out of the picture.

Review:

DOOMSDAY is an apocalyptic science fiction movie from Scotland that shows the breakdown of civilization in graphic, violent detail.

A deadly virus breaks out in Glasgow, Scotland, so the British government quarantines the whole country, building a wall around it. In the chaos, a woman gets her young daughter, whose eye has been shot out, into England.

About 20 years later, the little girl is now Major Eden Stirling, a secret service agent with many talents. A frightened world has abandoned Great Britain, where poverty and crime is barely under control in the cities. When another outbreak of the deadly virus is found in London, the Prime Minister and his primary associate, a devious businessman named Canaris, show Agent Stirling and her boss that there are people in Glasgow who apparently have survived the virus. They order her to take a military team into the city to find out if a leading scientist, Marcus Kane, has discovered a cure.

In the city, the team runs into a raving band of cannibals looking like they came out of the movie ROAD WARRIOR in an obvious homage to that movie. After killing all but four members of the team, they capture Stirling and one of her men. Stirling discovers that the leader is actually the son of Dr. Kane and has imprisoned his sister. She escapes, and the sister and her other brother lead Stirling and two other members of her team to Dr. Kane, who has establish a brutal feudal kingdom in rural Scotland. There, they will learn the secret of how these people survived, but they are caught in the war between Kane and his mad cannibal son.

The story of DOOMSDAY sounds rather stupid, but the filmmakers take the material seriously, which is the key to making silly apocalyptic stories like this one work. There is lots of exciting heroic action, but the action is accompanied by extremely graphic violence, including cannibalism and gruesome decapitations. The movie also contains abundant uses of the “f” word. The worldview is basically pagan, with some humanist elements. God and religion are simply left out of the picture.

This shows the degree to which Christianity has been forcibly removed from British culture. Many filmmakers there apparently don’t even assume that, when modern civilization breaks down, there will still be a remnant of God-fearing people who will want to rebuild it. Of course, now that an increasing Muslim population in Britain is giving a bad name to organized religion, Christianity and the Bible suffer some of the blowback. On the other hand, Christianity is the only thing capable of truly stopping the violent Muslim jihad and other goofy ideologies and heresies.

In Brief:

DOOMSDAY is an apocalyptic science fiction movie from Scotland that shows the breakdown of civilization in graphic, violent detail. A deadly virus breaks out in Glasgow, Scotland, so the British government quarantines the whole country, building a wall around it. In the chaos, a woman gets her young daughter, whose eye has been shot out, into England. About 20 years later, the little girl is now Major Eden Stirling, a secret service agent with many talents. When the virus breaks out again in London, the government orders Stirling to take a military team into Scotland to find out why there are survivors there. Her mission becomes caught in a war between a scientist running a brutal feudal kingdom and his rebellious cannibal son.

This story sounds stupid, but the filmmakers take the material seriously, which is the key to making silly apocalyptic stories work. There is lots of exciting heroic action, but the action is accompanied by extremely graphic violence, including cannibalism and gruesome decapitations. The movie also contains abundant uses of the “f” word. The worldview is basically pagan, with some humanist elements. God is simply left out of the picture.