FINAL DESTINATION 2

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 31, 2003

Starring: A. J. Cook, Michael Landes, Ali Larter, Terrence "T.C." Carter, Keegan Connor Tracy, Lynda Boyd, David Paetkau, and James N. Kirk

Genre: Horror

Audience: Teenagers and young
adults REVIEWER: Dr. Tom
Snyder FINAL DESTINATION 2
cleverly integrates the story
of the first movie with the
events of the second movie and
contains an allegorical
Christian worldview, but it's
full of strong foul language,
illegal drug use and extreme,
gory violence whose primary
goal is simply to titillate
the beastly bloodlust of its
intended teenage and young
adult audience. It also fails
to capitalize on the
theological, metaphysical
issues that its plot evokes,
but what can you expect of
such a horror movie whose
primary purpose is to
titillate, not to provoke
intelligent thought. In the
story, A. J. Cook plays
Kimberly Corman, a college
student who's driving her
friends to Daytona Beach,
Florida for some hijinks. Her
girlfriend seems mainly
interested in sex, however,
while the two boys going with
them are mainly interested in
the marijuana they've brought.
Kimberly has a violent vision
of being involved in a
terrific car crash that kills
many people, including her.
The vision strikes fear in her
heart, so she refuses to get
on the freeway from the on
ramp and gets out of her van.
The van, however, is blocking
the ramp, so the policeman who
was the first one killed in
her vision goes to find out
what's happening. While he's
talking to her by the side of
the road, the traffic accident
on the freeway starts to
happen. People are still
killed, but the people behind
her are saved. Kimberly's
friends, however, are not so
blessed because one of the
trucks on the freeway slams
into the van anyway, creating
a fiery, deadly ball of
flame. Back at the police
station, Kimberly tells the
other survivors that their
escape from death reminds her
of the incident from the first
movie. In that film, a young
man has a premonition of a
plane crash and makes his
friends avoid the flight. One
by one, the survivors start
dying in very weird
circumstances and gruesome
accidents. The survivors come
to believe that Death is now
stalking them, to get back
what he lost. The survivors in
the sequel also start dying in
new gruesome accidents. The
mysterious funeral attendant
from the first movie tells
Kimberly and the remaining
survivors that the only way to
defeat Death is with new life.
They try to save the baby of a
pregnant woman who also
survived the crash. They then
discover that each one of them
has a coincidental connection
to the plane crash survivors.
As more people die, the
traffic accident survivors
come to believe that the plane
crash survivors caused "a
ripple in Death's Design"
affecting them all. The
movie's references to the
"ripple in Death's Design"
cleverly weave both movies
together. Also, the movie's
premise, "New life defeats
death," gives FINAL
DESTINATION 2 an allegorical
Christian worldview that's
clever, original and
archetypal. The movie's
gratuitous gruesome violence,
however, and its gratuitous
foul language spoil these
artistic, moral and
metaphysical pretensions.
Therefore, MOVIEGUIDEĀ® cannot
recommend FINAL DESTINATION 2,
especially to the teenagers
and young adults who are its
target audience. In the end,
FINAL DESTINATION 2 just goes
too far, and that's not
right. Please address your
comments to: Robert Shaye &
Michael
Lynne Co-Chairman/Co-CEO New
Line Cinema 116 North
Robertson Blvd. Suite 200 Los
Angeles, CA 90048 Phone: (310)
854-5811 Fax: (310)
659-3568 Website:
www.newline.com

Rating: R

Runtime: 100 minutes

Address Comments To:

Content:

(C, FRFR, O, B, LLL, VVV, S, NN, A, DD, M) Allegorical Christian worldview with the premise "New life defeats death," but with some false religious notions about death and over-the-top gruesome violence with occult premonitions of disaster and death as well as moral appeal to conscience and people try to help others; 42 mostly strong obscenities, six strong profanities and 11 light profanities; extreme, gory violence includes terrible car crashes, decapitations, bodies split apart or squashed, trucks slam into people, speeding log slams into car's driver, steel ladder impales man's eye, explosions, charred bodies, barbecued human arm, birth scene, and drowning images; exhibitionism and some brief sexual references; upper male nudity and female flashes her breasts on highway; alcohol use; and, smoking, snorting cocaine and smoking marijuana.

GENRE: Horror

C

FRFR

O

B

LLL

VVV

S

NN

A

DD

M

Summary:

In FINAL DESTINATION 2, Death stalks a young woman and several other survivors of a terrible fatal car crash because they escaped their pre-ordained fate. Despite some allegorical Christian elements, FINAL DESTINATION 2 contains plenty of strong foul language, gruesome violence and false theological notions.

Review:

FINAL DESTINATION 2 cleverly integrates the story of the first movie with the events of the second movie and contains an allegorical Christian worldview, but it's full of strong foul language, illegal drug use and extreme, gory violence whose primary goal is simply to titillate the beastly bloodlust of its intended teenage and young adult audience. It also fails to capitalize on the theological, metaphysical issues that its plot evokes, but what can you expect of such a horror movie whose primary purpose is to titillate, not to provoke intelligent thought.

In the story, A. J. Cook plays Kimberly Corman, a college student who's driving her friends to Daytona Beach, Florida for some hijinks. Her girlfriend seems mainly interested in sex, however, while the two boys going with them are mainly interested in the marijuana they've brought. Kimberly has a violent vision of being involved in a terrific car crash that kills many people, including her. The vision strikes fear in her heart, so she refuses to get on the freeway from the on ramp and gets out of her van. The van, however, is blocking the ramp, so the policeman who was the first one killed in her vision goes to find out what's happening.

While he's talking to her by the side of the road, the traffic accident on the freeway starts to happen. People are still killed, but the people behind her are saved. Kimberly's friends, however, are not so blessed because one of the trucks on the freeway slams into the van anyway, creating a fiery, deadly ball of flame.

Back at the police station, Kimberly tells the other survivors that their escape from death reminds her of the incident from the first movie. In that film, a young man has a premonition of a plane crash and makes his friends avoid the flight. One by one, the survivors start dying in very weird circumstances and gruesome accidents. The survivors come to believe that Death is now stalking them, to get back what he lost.

The survivors in the sequel also start dying in new gruesome accidents. The mysterious funeral attendant from the first movie tells Kimberly and the remaining survivors that the only way to defeat Death is with new life. They try to save the baby of a pregnant woman who also survived the crash. They then discover that each one of them has a coincidental connection to the plane crash survivors. As more people die, the traffic accident survivors come to believe that the plane crash survivors caused "a ripple in Death's Design" affecting them all.

The movie's references to the "ripple in Death's Design" cleverly weave both movies together. Also, the movie's premise, "New life defeats death," gives FINAL DESTINATION 2 an allegorical Christian worldview that's clever, original and archetypal. The movie's gratuitous gruesome violence, however, and its gratuitous foul language spoil these artistic, moral and metaphysical pretensions. Therefore, MOVIEGUIDEĀ® cannot recommend FINAL DESTINATION 2, especially to the teenagers and young adults who are its target audience. In the end, FINAL DESTINATION 2 just goes too far, and that's not right.

Please address your comments to:

Robert Shaye & Michael Lynne

Co-Chairman/Co-CEO

New Line Cinema

116 North Robertson Blvd.

Suite 200

Los Angeles, CA 90048

Phone: (310) 854-5811

Fax: (310) 659-3568

Website: www.newline.com

In Brief: