FRESH

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 19, 1994

Starring: Sean Nelson, Samuel L.
Jackson, Giancarlo Esposito,
N'Bushe Wright, Ron Brice,
Jean LaMarre, & Jose Zuniga

Genre: Thriller

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 115 minutes

Distributor: Miramax Films

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Boaz Yakin

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Content:

(H, LLL, VVV, S, NN, D, M) Humanism; approximately 144 obscenities & 10 profanities; several shootings & two men are beaten with chains; two scenes of implied promiscuity; two scenes of brief male nudity; drug deals feature prominently in the story; and, themes of revenge and betrayal also featured prominently.

Summary:

Sean Nelson plays the title character in the critically acclaimed FRESH, a taut, disturbing thriller about a 12-year-old inner city drug runner whose growing contempt for the world around him erupts into a violent plan to escape the projects while making the local drug lords pay for their sins. Like other films dealing with life in the projects, however, FRESH's script is laden with obscenities and violence, so moviegoers beware.

Review:

Alienation and emotional battle fatigue are at the core of FRESH, a disturbing new thriller by first time director Boaz Yakin. Newcomer Sean Nelson plays the title character, a bright 12-year-old boy whose daily routine consists of going to school, running drugs for the powerful neighborhood dealers and then stashing the day's profits in his secret hideout. It takes the death of an innocent girl and the drug addiction of his sister to make his contempt quietly erupt into a plan to escape from the projects while making the local drug lords pay for their sins.

FRESH benefits from strong performances by all the principals, especially Sean Nelson whose portrayal of Fresh as a battle-hardened survivor of the Urban Wars of '94 is poignant, tragic and scary. A look into his eyes is a look into the future and a reminder that, in war, the children that survive sometimes deserve more pity than those who die. Regrettably, like other films dealing with life in the projects, FRESH's script is laden with obscenities and violence, so moviegoers should beware. The film does not attempt to understand, explain or assign blame for why life in the projects is the way it is; rather, it uses the elements of the genre to fashion a taut suspense thriller worthy of Hitchcock.

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