GUNMEN

Content -3
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 04, 1994

Starring: Mario Van Peebles, Christopher
Lambert, Dennis Leary, Patrick
Stewart, & Sally Kirkland.

Genre: Action

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 91 minutes

Distributor: Dimension Films

Director: Deran Saraflan

Executive Producer:

Producer: Laurence Mark, John Davis &
John Flock

Writer: Stephen Sommers

Address Comments To:

Content:

(H, LLL, VVV, SS, NN) Humanist worldview; 50 obscenities & 5 profanities; dozens of slayings (primarily by shooting, but also by knives & spear gun), two characters buried alive, child watches parents shot to death, numerous beatings, & one character tortured by being hung upside down from helicopter; one explicit sex scene; frontal female nudity; and, one character gleefully eats a fly & a large bug.

Summary:

GUNMEN is an action film with some comic intentions, in which an unofficial DEA agent and a dead informant's brother become unwilling partners in a search for $400 million in hidden drug money. The ongoing series of chases, narrow escapes and shootouts rack up a hefty and bloody body count by the time the final credits roll, and the language is ear-splitting.

Review:

GUNMEN is an action film with some comic intentions, in which an unofficial DEA agent and a dead informant's brother become unwilling partners in a search for $400 million in hidden drug money. The story involves the evil drug lords in South America who are vicious and ruthless. When the first event in a film is the depiction of a young woman, squealing and squirming, closed into a coffin and then buried alive, you might expect what follows to be less than genteel. The nefarious Loomis (the new Star Trek's Patrick Stewart), one of the main characters, seeks to find the money reportedly hidden on an boat. But Loomis and his cohorts don't know which boat. Some "good guys," from the DEA, are also searching for the money and desire to break up the drug rings. In the end, the good guys find the money, although it is not clear what they will do with it.

Most of the film is one chase/shootout/narrow escape after another, punctuated by episodes of violence inflicted by the drug lords upon each other in a series of revolts and double-crosses. The film is rarely boring, and at times, the banter is funny, but the filmmakers don't understand the difference between action and violence, and can't keep the dialogue clear of ear-splitting obscenity for more than a few minutes at a time.

In Brief: