HIGHWAYMEN

Taking Road Rage to Disturbing Levels

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 13, 2004

Starring: James Caviezel, Rhona Mitra,
Frankie Faison, and Colm Feore

Genre: Thriller

Audience: Older teenagers to adults

Rating: R for violence, some gore and
brief language

Runtime: 89 minutes

Distributor: New Line Cinema

Director: Robert Harmon PRODUCERS: Brad
Jenkel, Carroll Kemp, and Mike
Marcus

Executive Producer:

Producer: Brad Jenkel, Carroll Kemp, and
Mike Marcus EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: David Brewington,
Toby Emmerich, Lynn Harris,
Avi Lerner, Trevor Short, and
Tim Van Rellim

Writer: Craig Mitchell and Hans
Bauer BASED ON THE NOVEL BY:
N/A

Address Comments To:

Robert Shaye and Michael Lynne
Co-Chairman/Co-CEO
New Line Cinema
116 North Robertson Blvd.
Suite 200
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Phone: (310) 854-5811
Fax: (310) 854-1453
Web Page: www.flf.com

Content:

(PaPa, Ro, L, VV, S, N, M) Revenge-driven, pagan worldview with Romantic notion of individual vs. the rest of the world; six medium-to-strong obscenities and one light profanity; occasionally gory violence includes many people hit by a speeding car, a point-blank shooting, cars crashing, people dragged by cars, and reckless driving; one brief but extremely crude sexual reference; woman’s bare back shown; and, police officer gives into emotion and punishes criminal, and insane man stalks and terrorizes woman.

GENRE: Thriller

Summary:

HIGHWAYMEN is a violent, perverse, revenge-inspired thriller featuring Jim Caviezel and Rhona Mitra. The movie is sadistic and has nothing to redeem it. In addition to some gory violence, there is intermittent foul language, a disturbing sexual comment, and a lot of plot holes.

Review:

HIGHWAYMEN is a violent, perverse, revenge-inspired thriller featuring Jim Caviezel (it was filmed pre-PASSION) and Rhona Mitra of TV’s BOSTON LEGAL. Caviezel’s character Rennie watched his wife die when a maniac driver ran into her and killed her. The driver escaped, but Rennie’s anger leads him to hunt down the hit-and-run murderer. Here, the movie takes a bizarre turn, as the man who ran into Rennie’s wife becomes deranged and begins intentionally causing road accidents and multiple deaths across the country. The driver is sadistic and targets certain people repeatedly, like Rennie and a woman named Molly. Together, they team up to bait the driver and try to kill him.

Police seem unable to solve the case, so Rennie must bring the hit-and-run driver to justice on his own. Unfortunately, his mission is less about justice than revenge, and so he pursues the driver with fierceness and bitterness.

Like the demented driver, the movie itself is sadistic, showing us the moment of impact when the car hits innocent victims and sometimes their bloody aftermaths. There is nothing to redeem HIGHWAYMEN, as even the last frame of the movie shows a police detective giving in to revenge instead of upholding justice. In addition to the violence, there is intermittent foul language and a bizarrely out of place and disturbing sexual comment, plus a lot of plot holes.

In Brief:

HIGHWAYMEN is a violent, perverse, revenge-inspired thriller featuring Jim Caviezel and Rhona Mitra. Caviezel’s character Rennie watched his wife die when a maniac driver hit and killed her. The driver escaped, but Rennie’s anger leads him to hunt down the hit-and-run murderer. Here, the movie takes a bizarre turn, as the man who ran into Rennie’s wife becomes deranged and begins intentionally causing accidents and multiple deaths across the country. The driver is sadistic and targets certain people repeatedly, like Rennie and a woman named Molly. Together, they team up to bait the driver to try to kill him.

Police seem unable to solve the case, so Rennie must bring the hit-and-run driver to justice on his own. Unfortunately, his mission is less about justice than revenge. He pursues the driver with bitterness. The movie is sadistic, showing us the moment of impact when the car hits innocent victims and sometimes the bloody aftermaths. There is nothing to redeem HIGHWAYMEN. The last frame shows a police detective submitting to revenge instead of upholding justice. Added to the violence is intermittent foul language and a disturbing sexual comment, plus a lot of plot holes.