I CAPTURE THE CASTLE

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 11, 2003

Starring: Henry Thomas, Marc Blucas,
Rose Byrne, Romola Garai, Bill
Nighy, Tara Fitzgerald, Sinead
Cusak, and Henry Cavill

Genre: Romance

Audience: Older teenagers and
adults REVIEWER: Jan
Stallones "I have loved, I
love, I will love," writes
Cassandra, at the close of I
CAPTURE THE CASTLE, a BBC
adaptation of Dodie Smith's
popular novel set in the
English countryside in the
1930s. Her words nicely sum up
all that occurs in and around
a romantic, but rundown castle
her father has rented to try
and unstop his writer's block,
which has plagued him since
his first successful novel
years earlier. I CAPTURE THE
CASTLE is a beautiful movie
complete with lovely shots of
castle towers and Suffolk
countryside. Family patriarch,
Mortmain (Bill Nighy), packs
his young family off to a
picturesque castle in Suffolk.
As he struggles to write his
second novel, his family soon
struggles with isolation and
poverty. His second wife Topaz
(Tara Fitzgerald) is an
eccentric artist, but a
supportive and loving wife and
stepmother to Mortmain's
daughters Cassandra (Romola
Garai) and Rose (Rose Byrne).
The girls are sure they are
trapped forever in the castle
they thought wonderful and
romantic when they moved in
years before, but all that
changes when two American men
inherit their home. Simon
(Henry Thomas) and Neil (Marc
Blucas) arrive in England to
settle their relative's estate
and don't care much for the
girls at first, but Rose
quickly and keenly sets her
sights on Simon. He is her way
out of the trapped existence
that has been crushing her.
Rose and Cassandra scheme to
get Simon to propose, and the
romance is joined. I CAPTURE
THE CASTLE tells an engaging
story, and its characters are
both interesting and winsome.
As is expected with castles
and young ladies, romance
rules the day. Rose's romantic
intentions are calculated.
While she is game for true
love, it is not as valuable to
her as her escape from
poverty. Her free spirit
stepmother and distracted
father leave her at a loss for
understanding the right way
for a woman to pursue a man,
thus at a time when it was
most important, she and her
sister complain that "the
thing we knew least about was
being women." Cassandra sees
this clearly and worries that
Rose does not love Simon as
she should, which leads to
even more complications.
Although Cassandra tries hard
to help Rose accomplish her
dreams, she falls into the
trap of caring too much for
Simon, and ends up with a
moral dilemma of her own. The
guiding forces in I CAPTURE
THE CASTLE are the heart and
emotions. Cassandra attempts
to do what is right and good,
although she does eventually
get caught up in the pull of
romance herself. The pagan
rite elements of this are not
central; as a matter of fact
they seem a bit out of place,
almost like they were added to
complete the "castle in
England" feel. Rose and
Cassandra have a habit of
dancing around a fire and
shouting, calling it a
midsummer's eve rite.
Cassandra re-enacts this
practice with Simon, but it
feels like a childish game
more than a serious rite.
However, it is clear that
these characters find their
centers in sensual things. The
family's servant, Stephen, is
smitten by Cassandra. Though
he acts nobly in his
intentions toward her, he
eventually becomes corrupted
by sensuality at the hands of
those outside of the castle.
I CAPTURE THE CASTLE covers a
lot of ground -- a man's
struggle for worth and his
work, family loyalty and love,
fidelity in marriage, and
coming of age for young
Cassandra. Romola Garai as
Cassandra is a fabulous young
actress and it is hard to take
your eyes off of her
throughout the movie. Henry
Thomas does an excellent job
as Simon. Some of the movie's
side stories are shortchanged,
however, in the telling the
tale of Cassandra and Rose.
Rated R for some nudity, there
is no explicit sex in I
CAPTURE THE CASTLE, and two of
its characters strive to love
"honorably." Love, however, is
viewed more as a force,
sometimes magical and
sometimes "a murderess thing."
The main flaw is that love is
viewed as a force that simply
can't be managed. Cassandra
writes in her diary, "There is
no choice in love," and "There
are too many games in love."
In writing these lines, she
clearly recognizes the
problems of love removed from
its Divine Source and sacred
definition. Please address
your comments to: Samuel
Goldwyn, Jr., Chairman/CEO The
Samuel Goldwyn Co. 10203 Santa
Monica Blvd. Los Angeles, CA
90067 Phone: (310)
552-2255 Fax: (310) 284-8493

Rating: R

Runtime: 113 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films

Director: Tim Fywell

Executive Producer:

Producer: David Parfitt EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Mike Newell, Mark
Shivas, Steve Christian, Keith
Evans

Writer: Heidi Thomas BASED ON THE
NOVEL BY: Dodie Smith

Address Comments To:

Content:

(RoRo, Pa, O, B, L, V, S, NN, A, M) Romantic worldview with characters driven by the heart and emotions (though one tries hard to fight emotion), sensual pleasure and material gain as motivation for some main characters, two scenes involving pagan practices (wishing on a gargoyle and a midsummer pagan rite dance), with biblical values pursued by two characters to love others honorably; four light obscenities and six exclamatory profanities; one very brief slapping scene; two scenes of female characters imagining their wedding night with husbands walking in with no shirt, females sitting on beds in nightgowns, one scene of clothed making out stopped by one character for being "not right," scene of implied premarital sex (couple exiting bedroom in the morning), two instances of implied unfaithfulness, but nothing graphic depicted; fairly lengthy scene of non-sexual female nude from the waist up; and, three occasions of consuming alcohol, but no drunkenness.

GENRE: Romance

RoRo

Pa

O

B

L

V

S

NN

A

M

Summary:

I CAPTURE THE CASTLE is a tale of romance set in the 1930s English countryside, where two sisters living in isolation and poverty in an old castle see their opportunity for love and escape in two Americans who inherit their home. Rated R for some nudity, the main flaw is that love is viewed as a force that simply can't be managed.

Review:

"I have loved, I love, I will love," writes Cassandra, at the close of I CAPTURE THE CASTLE, a BBC adaptation of Dodie Smith's popular novel set in the English countryside in the 1930s. Her words nicely sum up all that occurs in and around a romantic, but rundown castle her father has rented to try and unstop his writer's block, which has plagued him since his first successful novel years earlier.

I CAPTURE THE CASTLE is a beautiful movie complete with lovely shots of castle towers and Suffolk countryside. Family patriarch, Mortmain (Bill Nighy), packs his young family off to a picturesque castle in Suffolk. As he struggles to write his second novel, his family soon struggles with isolation and poverty. His second wife Topaz (Tara Fitzgerald) is an eccentric artist, but a supportive and loving wife and stepmother to Mortmain's daughters Cassandra (Romola Garai) and Rose (Rose Byrne). The girls are sure they are trapped forever in the castle they thought wonderful and romantic when they moved in years before, but all that changes when two American men inherit their home. Simon (Henry Thomas) and Neil (Marc Blucas) arrive in England to settle their relative's estate and don't care much for the girls at first, but Rose quickly and keenly sets her sights on Simon. He is her way out of the trapped existence that has been crushing her. Rose and Cassandra scheme to get Simon to propose, and the romance is joined.

I CAPTURE THE CASTLE tells an engaging story, and its characters are both interesting and winsome. As is expected with castles and young ladies, romance rules the day. Rose's romantic intentions are calculated. While she is game for true love, it is not as valuable to her as her escape from poverty. Her free spirit stepmother and distracted father leave her at a loss for understanding the right way for a woman to pursue a man, thus at a time when it was most important, she and her sister complain that "the thing we knew least about was being women." Cassandra sees this clearly and worries that Rose does not love Simon as she should, which leads to even more complications. Although Cassandra tries hard to help Rose accomplish her dreams, she falls into the trap of caring too much for Simon, and ends up with a moral dilemma of her own.

The guiding forces in I CAPTURE THE CASTLE are the heart and emotions. Cassandra attempts to do what is right and good, although she does eventually get caught up in the pull of romance herself. The pagan rite elements of this are not central; as a matter of fact they seem a bit out of place, almost like they were added to complete the "castle in England" feel. Rose and Cassandra have a habit of dancing around a fire and shouting, calling it a midsummer's eve rite. Cassandra re-enacts this practice with Simon, but it feels like a childish game more than a serious rite. However, it is clear that these characters find their centers in sensual things. The family's servant, Stephen, is smitten by Cassandra. Though he acts nobly in his intentions toward her, he eventually becomes corrupted by sensuality at the hands of those outside of the castle.

I CAPTURE THE CASTLE covers a lot of ground -- a man's struggle for worth and his work, family loyalty and love, fidelity in marriage, and coming of age for young Cassandra. Romola Garai as Cassandra is a fabulous young actress and it is hard to take your eyes off of her throughout the movie. Henry Thomas does an excellent job as Simon. Some of the movie's side stories are shortchanged, however, in the telling the tale of Cassandra and Rose. Rated R for some nudity, there is no explicit sex in I CAPTURE THE CASTLE, and two of its characters strive to love "honorably." Love, however, is viewed more as a force, sometimes magical and sometimes "a murderess thing." The main flaw is that love is viewed as a force that simply can't be managed. Cassandra writes in her diary, "There is no choice in love," and "There are too many games in love." In writing these lines, she clearly recognizes the problems of love removed from its Divine Source and sacred definition.

Please address your comments to:

Samuel Goldwyn, Jr., Chairman/CEO

The Samuel Goldwyn Co.

10203 Santa Monica Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90067

Phone: (310) 552-2255

Fax: (310) 284-8493

SUMMARY: I CAPTURE THE CASTLE is a tale of romance set in the 1930s English countryside, where two sisters living in isolation and poverty in an old castle see their opportunity for love and escape in two Americans who inherit their home. Rated R for some nudity, the main flaw is that love is viewed as a force that simply can't be managed.

In Brief: