LOONEY TUNES: BACK IN ACTION

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 14, 2003

Starring: Brendan Fraser, Jenna Elfman,
Steve Martin, Timothy Dalton,
Heather Locklear, Joan Cusack,
and the voice talents of Joe
Alaskey, Steve Babiar, Justine
Baker, and Bob Bergen

Genre: Animation/Comedy

Audience: All ages REVIEWER: Lisa A.
Rice In LOONEY TUNES: BACK IN
ACTION, Daffy Duck is fed up
with all the attention going
to Bugs Bunny, and he’s on
the bad list of the Warner
Bros. Vice President, played
by Jenna Elfman. So he quits
Hollywood, teams up with
recently fired stuntman Bobby
Delmont, played by Brendan
Fraser, and embarks on a big
Las Vegas adventure. Their
mission is to find Bobby's
actor/spy father and his
missing blue diamond. . . and
stay one step ahead of Bugs
and the studio execs on their
trail! If they don’t, the
strange and diabolical
president of Acme (Steve
Martin) will undoubtedly be
able to fulfill his evil plan
of world domination. The movie
is fun, frantic, and full of
laughs. The combination of
animation and live action is
fascinating, and the
production quality and
all-star cast shows off the
movie’s obviously huge
budget. Brendan Fraser is
great as the fired security
guard/stunt man wannabe, but
Jenna Elfman is rather
unbelievable as Warner
Bros.’ Vice President of
Comedy, and there is little
chemistry between her and
Fraser. Steve Martin, usually
hilarious, comes across as
more strange and over-acted
than funny. The voice talent
of Joe Alaskey playing Bugs
Bunny, Daffy Duck, Tweety Pie,
Sylvester, and Marvin the
Martian is sheer brilliance.
However, no expense was spared
in delivering to an audience
bigger-than-life action and
chase scenes. The writers also
toss in allusions to many
earlier Warner Bros. cartoons
and movies, and even recent
movies such as FINDING NEMO.
Some members of the audience
were guffawing so loudly it
was almost distracting. The
problem with LOONEY TUNES is
that it has a Las Vegas,
gritty feel to it. Heather
Locklear plays a Las Vegas
showgirl who starts out
looking like Little Bo Peep,
but then strips off her frumpy
outfit to reveal a skimpy,
leather outfit with a garter
strap around her leg. She
dances a seductive dance and
sings a song that encourages
men to find themselves “bad
girls.” The billboards in
Las Vegas are loud and
overwhelming, as are the
shows, gunfights, and car
chases. There are a few mildly
crude scenes depicting body
humor, and there are a few
depictions of alcohol, such as
the martini Bugs is served –
complete with a carrot. There
are also a few mystical,
occult elements seen in the
storyline of the blue diamond
and its powers that can turn
people into monkeys. LOONEY
TUNES is the antithesis of
peacefulness, and my
middle-schoolers and I got
splitting headaches from the
frenetic pacing of the action.
Our 8-year-old loved it,
though we had to cover his
eyes during the Heather
Locklear dance. Overall, moral
audiences will be drawn to the
movie because it’s a
star-studded cartoon that
brings back so many childhood
memories, but when they get
there, and the headache
commences, and the children's
eyes have to be covered,
they’ll perhaps wonder, as
did we, why the producers felt
necessary to make a
children’s cartoon into a
sometimes gritty, often
frantic PG-rated movie. Please
address your comments
to: Barry A. Meyer,
Chairman/CEO Warner Bros.,
Inc. 4000 Warner
Blvd. Burbank, CA
91522-0001 Phone: (818)
954-6000 Website:
www.movies.warnerbros.com

Rating: PG

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: Warner Bros.

Director: Joe Dante

Executive Producer:

Producer: Paula Weinstein and Bernie
Goldman EXECUTIVE PRODUCER:
Chris deFaria and Larry Doyle

Writer: Larry Doyle

Address Comments To:

Content:

(Ro, H, O, FR, L, VVV, S, AA, M) Romantic, cartoonish outlook with real people and animated characters interacting in a frantic, dizzying race, with motivations ranging from greed to heroism, and some humanistic overtones with all the worldliness of the Las Vegas scene, and some occult-type, mystical elements with blue diamond able to turn people and characters into monkeys; about three light obscenities, but some crude body humor; heavy cartoon violence with both humans and cartoon characters getting smashed, crushed, burned, shot at, flattened by anvils, tied on railroad tracks with oncoming trains, blown up with dynamite, hooked up to electrical machines that cause them to hit themselves in the head, and/or general Acme/Road Runner-type violent inventions; some elements of sexiness with Heather Locklear singing and dancing a provocative song about getting oneself a “bad girl”; no nudity; some cartoon portrayals of alcoholism; and, kidnapping, lying, stealing, cheating, and corruption, most of it rebuked.

GENRE: Animation/Comedy

Ro

H

O

L

VVV

S

AA

M

Summary:

In LOONEY TUNES: BACK IN ACTION, Daffy Duck and a fired Hollywood security guard search for a missing father and the mythical Blue Diamond that could destroy the world. A cute, high-dollar, star-studded cartoon/live action combination is marred by a gritty, Las Vegas tone and a seductive showgirl dance scene.

Review:

In LOONEY TUNES: BACK IN ACTION, Daffy Duck is fed up with all the attention going to Bugs Bunny, and he’s on the bad list of the Warner Bros. Vice President, played by Jenna Elfman. So he quits Hollywood, teams up with recently fired stuntman Bobby Delmont, played by Brendan Fraser, and embarks on a big Las Vegas adventure. Their mission is to find Bobby's actor/spy father and his missing blue diamond. . . and stay one step ahead of Bugs and the studio execs on their trail! If they don’t, the strange and diabolical president of Acme (Steve Martin) will undoubtedly be able to fulfill his evil plan of world domination.

The movie is fun, frantic, and full of laughs. The combination of animation and live action is fascinating, and the production quality and all-star cast shows off the movie’s obviously huge budget. Brendan Fraser is great as the fired security guard/stunt man wannabe, but Jenna Elfman is rather unbelievable as Warner Bros.’ Vice President of Comedy, and there is little chemistry between her and Fraser. Steve Martin, usually hilarious, comes across as more strange and over-acted than funny.

The voice talent of Joe Alaskey playing Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Tweety Pie, Sylvester, and Marvin the Martian is sheer brilliance. However, no expense was spared in delivering to an audience bigger-than-life action and chase scenes. The writers also toss in allusions to many earlier Warner Bros. cartoons and movies, and even recent movies such as FINDING NEMO. Some members of the audience were guffawing so loudly it was almost distracting.

The problem with LOONEY TUNES is that it has a Las Vegas, gritty feel to it. Heather Locklear plays a Las Vegas showgirl who starts out looking like Little Bo Peep, but then strips off her frumpy outfit to reveal a skimpy, leather outfit with a garter strap around her leg. She dances a seductive dance and sings a song that encourages men to find themselves “bad girls.” The billboards in Las Vegas are loud and overwhelming, as are the shows, gunfights, and car chases. There are a few mildly crude scenes depicting body humor, and there are a few depictions of alcohol, such as the martini Bugs is served – complete with a carrot. There are also a few mystical, occult elements seen in the storyline of the blue diamond and its powers that can turn people into monkeys.

LOONEY TUNES is the antithesis of peacefulness, and my middle-schoolers and I got splitting headaches from the frenetic pacing of the action. Our 8-year-old loved it, though we had to cover his eyes during the Heather Locklear dance. Overall, moral audiences will be drawn to the movie because it’s a star-studded cartoon that brings back so many childhood memories, but when they get there, and the headache commences, and the children's eyes have to be covered, they’ll perhaps wonder, as did we, why the producers felt necessary to make a children’s cartoon into a sometimes gritty, often frantic PG-rated movie.

Please address your comments to:

Barry A. Meyer, Chairman/CEO

Warner Bros., Inc.

4000 Warner Blvd.

Burbank, CA 91522-0001

Phone: (818) 954-6000

Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com

SUMMARY: In LOONEY TUNES: BACK IN ACTION, Daffy Duck and a fired Hollywood security guard search for a missing father and the mythical Blue Diamond that could destroy the world. A cute, high-dollar, star-studded cartoon/live action combination is marred by a gritty, Las Vegas tone and a seductive showgirl dance scene.

In Brief: