MAD MONEY

Breaking God’s Commandments

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 18, 2008

Starring: Diane Keaton, Queen Latifah,
Katie Holmes, Ted Danson,
Stephen Root, Roger Cross,
Adam Rothenberg, and
Christopher McDonald

Genre: Crime Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 104 minutes

Distributor: Overture Films/Starz
Entertainment

Director: Callie Khouri

Executive Producer: Wendy Kram, Robert Green, Avi
Lerner, Danny Dimbort, Trevor
Short, Boaz Davidson, and
Michael P. Flannigan

Producer: Jay Cohen, James Acheson and
Frank De Martini

Writer: Glenn Gers

Address Comments To:

Robert Clasen, Chairman/CEO
Starz LLC
(Overture Films)
8900 Liberty Circle
Englewood, CO 80112
Phone: (720) 852-7700
Fax: (720) 852-8555
Website: www.starz.com

Content:

(RoRoRo, APAP, AcapAcap, AbAb, C, B, LLL, V, S, B, A, MMM) Very strong Romantic worldview with overt attacks on American materialism, the American Dream of middle class mobility and hard work, with a strong implied attack on capitalism along with elements of moral relativism that justify breaking God’s commandment against stealing, plus one character makes a sacrifice for another person, but thieves get away with their crimes for the most part, although they encounter some penalties, which they overcome at the very end, and protagonists turn to clever stealing to get material things and help one protagonist’s young children, which is ultimately rewarded at the very end; about 18 obscenities, three strong profanities and 22 light profanities; no sex scenes but references and jokes (not extremely graphic) about sex and adult fornication, including two women encourage advise third woman to get a boyfriend and be sexually active again; one shot of rear male nudity in a non-sexual context; brief alcohol use; no smoking or drugs; and, plenty of stealing that’s ultimately (though not entirely) rewarded, lying, government official covers up a problem to keep from being embarrassed by his clear failure, security guard betrays employer’s trust, moral relativism, and deceit.

Summary:

MAD MONEY is a crime comedy about three women working at the Federal Reaserve Depository in Kansas City, who find a way to steal money from carts full of old bills scheduled to be destroyed. MAD MONEY is a breezy, engaging comedy, but it has a very strong Romantic worldview that overtly attacks the American Dream and justifies breaking God’s commandment against stealing.

Review:

MAD MONEY is a caper comedy about three women robbing the Federal Reserve in Kansas City out of old money scheduled for destruction.

The movie opens with Bridget and Don Cardigan, played by Diane Keaton and Ted Danson, having to put their home up for sale. After being laid off, Don is no longer young enough to get a good new job, even though they are $288,000 in debt. With no job skills, Bridget is forced to become a cleaning lady at the Federal Reserve Depository in Kansas City.

While going on her rounds, Bridget figures out a way to steal money from carts full of old bills scheduled to be destroyed. She enlists the help of Nina, a hard-working single mother with two boys played by Queen Latifah, and Jackie, a bouncy twenty-something played by Katie Holmes.

Eventually, the women get help from their spouses and Jackie’s new boyfriend, a security guard at the depository. They become too careless and emboldened, however, and a bank examiner starts to examine their newfound wealth. This unlikely crime syndicate is pushed to the limits of their ingenuity to stay one step ahead of the law.

MAD MONEY is a breezy, engaging comedy. It has a very strong Romantic worldview, however, that overtly critiques the American Dream of achieving success through hard work, ingenuity and honesty. It also justifies breaking God’s commandment against stealing and overtly attacks the American business system of selling goods and services, including the American consumer society that sells products but too often seduces people to become materialistic. Finally, MAD MONEY contains plenty of foul language, including many light profanities, and a few humorous moments with light sexual innuendoes.

Crime comedies like MAD MONEY where viewers are supposed to root for thieves are often highly problematic, but this movie’s overt Romantic worldview is strongly immoral and ultimately abhorrent. No wonder so many of America’s youths think it is okay to steal copyrighted songs and software off the Internet, or to pirate the movies that Hollywood makes. Once again, it is the media that creates the culture in which we live. MAD MONEY puts down the American system of enticing advertising and gleaming stores filled with attractive displays of goods, but it becomes part of the problem.

In Brief:

MAD MONEY, a crime comedy, opens with Bridget and Don Cardigan, played by Diane Keaton and Ted Danson, having to sell their middle-class home. After being laid off, Don is no longer young enough to get a good new job. With no job skills, Bridget is forced to become a cleaning lady at the Federal Reserve Depository in Kansas City. While going on her rounds, Bridget figures out how to steal money from carts full of old bills scheduled to be destroyed. She enlists the help of Nina, a hard-working single mother played by Queen Latifah, and Jackie, a bouncy twenty-something played by Katie Holmes. Eventually, the women and their families get careless, and they have to figure out a way to stay one step ahead of the law.

MAD MONEY is a breezy, engaging comedy, but it has a very strong Romantic worldview that overtly attacks the American Dream of achieving success through hard work, ingenuity and honesty. It justifies breaking God’s commandment against stealing and attacks the American business system. Finally, MAD MONEY contains plenty of foul language, including light profanities, and some humorous moments with light sexual innuendoes.