MADE-UP

The Script Needs a Makeover Instead

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 06, 2004

Starring: Brooke Adams, Tony Shalhoub,
Lynne Adams, Eva Amurri, Light
Eternity, and Gary Sinise

Genre: Comedy/Satire

Audience: Adults

Rating: Not Rated

Runtime: 96 minutes

Distributor: Sister Films

Director: Tony Shalhoub PRODUCERS: Lynne
Adams, Brooke Adams, and Mark
Donadio

Executive Producer:

Producer: Lynne Adams, Brooke Adams, and
Mark Donadio EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: George Fifield and
Bob and Lois Weiner

Writer: Lynne Adams BASED ON A PLAY
BY: Lynne Adams

Address Comments To:

Lynne Adams
Sister Films
9 Myrtle Street
Jamaica Plains, MA 02130
Telephone: (617) 983-0906

Content:

(H, Fe, B, LLL, V, S, N, AA, D, M) Light humanist worldview with light feminist perspective and some moral concerns; nine mostly light obscenities, two strong profanities, and 16 light profanities; light comic violence such as one or two pratfalls; man leaves his wife for another woman and lives with her, woman offers herself to her live-in lover while they’re in bed; female cleavage and rear female nudity when drunken woman does cartwheel; alcohol use and ex-alcoholic falls off wagon and gets very drunk; smoking; and, jealousy rebuked, lying, and manipulation.

GENRE: Comedy/Satire

Summary:

In MADE-UP, a satire on culture’s obsession with beauty, a middle-aged woman stars in her crazy sister’s documentary about older women getting a makeover. MADE-UP starts off funny enough, but the low budget, jerky camera movements, and convoluted script become tiresome after the first 40 minutes.

Review:

MADE-UP is a feminist satire on culture’s obsession with beauty, especially as it affects older women. It stars Brooke Adams, the wife of TV star Tony Shalhoub of MONK, who directed this movie. Adams plays Elizabeth, a middle-aged former actress and ex-alcoholic, who reluctantly agrees to appear in her sister Kate’s student documentary, where Elizabeth’s daughter Sara will touch up her gray hair and sagging face. The hook is that the will use Sara’s makeover of her mom to confront Elizabeth’s ex-husband, who left her for a self-absorbed, younger artist named Molly. Shalhoub plays Elizabeth’s befuddled new suitor, who gets confused between the old Elizabeth and the new one.

MADE-UP starts off funny enough, but the low budget, jerky camera movements, and meandering, convoluted script become tiresome after the first 40 minutes. The script clearly needs its own makeover, and the actors and director badly need more money and time to accomplish what they tried to do. The artistic poverty of this work is more in need of extreme caution than the mature content, which is only perhaps mildly offensive. Although the movie’s perspective is feminist, it is not overtly didactic. In fact, there is much good to be said against modern society’s obsession with physical appearance, and the film also rebukes the green monster that is called jealousy. MADE-UP also contains plenty of light foul language, plus two strong profanities.

In Brief:

MADE-UP is a feminist satire on culture’s obsession with beauty, especially as it affects older women. It stars Brooke Adams, the wife of TV star Tony Shalhoub of MONK, who directed this movie. Adams plays Elizabeth, a middle-aged former actress and ex-alcoholic, who reluctantly agrees to appear in her sister Kate’s student documentary, where Elizabeth’s daughter Sara will touch up her gray hair and sagging face. The hook is that the will use Sara’s makeover of her mom to confront Elizabeth’s ex-husband, who left her for a self-absorbed, younger artist named Molly. Shalhoub plays Elizabeth’s befuddled new suitor, who gets confused between the old Elizabeth and the new one.

MADE-UP starts off funny enough, but the low budget, jerky camera movements, and convoluted script become tiresome after the first 40 minutes. The script clearly needs its own makeover, and the actors and director badly need more money to accomplish what they tried to do. The artistic poverty of this work is more in need of extreme caution than the mature content, which is only probably mildly offensive. Although the movie’s perspective is feminist, it is not overtly didactic. It contains plenty of light foul language.