MI VIDA LOCA Add To My Top 10

Content -3
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 15, 1994

Starring: Angel Aviles, Seidy Lopez, Jacob Vargas, Magali Alvarado, & Marlo Marron

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults & older teenagers

Rating: R

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Allison Anders

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Content:

(NA, H, PC, LLL, VV, S, A, Ab, O) Pagan worldview with secular humanist premise & politically correct elements; 123 obscenities & 3 profanities; moderate violence; implied promiscuity; extensive alcohol use; religion portrayed as magical; and, mild occult elements.

Summary:

MI VIDA LOCA is a realistic drama about life in the Echo Park barrio in Los Angeles. Though violent and replete with offensive language, it is a colorful and realistic portrait of thousands of teenagers who daily live in terror, bitterness and despair. Regrettably, the film offers no hope for those inhabitants.

Review:

MI VIDA LOCA is a realistic drama about life in the Echo Park barrio in Los Angeles, though it could have been filmed in any inner city neighborhood in America. Director and writer Allison Anders uses elements of real-life stories to portray the terrifying hardships of the lives of teenage, Latino gang members. The language is realistic, often lapsing into vulgarities and replete with obscenities. MI VIDA LOCA is divided into three loosely-connected episodes which unite to present a world which, as the title proclaims, is crazy. Drugs are seen as the key to wealth. Promiscuity is rampant, as love is confused with lust. All the characters see life as short and violent. Those who manage to survive are either disabled or bitterly hard-hearted.

These barrio teenagers live this way is because they see no easy way out. The outside world makes it difficult for them to enter, while the forces of the barrio confine them in shackles of despair. The director's call for social action is both politically correct and humanistic: there is no way out for those in the barrio unless someone goes in and helps them out. While not the message of the film, this is, however, also the message of the Gospel to the sinner: there is no way out of sinful life except through Christ who came into the world to set us free. Regrettably, the film offers no hope for those inhabitants.

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