MR. 3000

Leave the Kids at Home for This Game

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 17, 2004

Starring: Bernie Mac, Angela Bassett,
Michael Rispoli, and Brian J.
White

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13 for sexual content and
language

Runtime: 101 minutes

Distributor: Touchstone Pictures/Buena
Vista Pictures

Director: Charles Stone III PRODUCERS:
Gary Barber, Roger Birnbaum,
and Maggie Wilde

Executive Producer:

Producer: Gary Barber, Roger Birnbaum,
and Maggie Wilde EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Timothy M. Bourne,
Jonathan Glickman, Steve
Greener, and Frank Marshall

Writer: Eric Champnella, Keith
Mitchell, and Howard Michael
Gould BASED ON THE NOVEL BY:
N/A

Address Comments To:

Michael Eisner, Chairman/CEO
Buena Vista Distribution Co.
(Walt Disney Pictures, Caravan, Hollywood, Miramax, and Touchstone Pictures)
Dick Cook, Chairman
The Walt Disney Company
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521
Phone: (818) 560-1000
Website: www.disney.com

Content:

(CC, PaPa, LLL, SS, N, A, M) Redemptive plotline in which man sacrifices personal accomplishment for his team, with pagan moral permissiveness; 58 obscenities and slang for body parts, with no profanities; copious sex jokes and discussion, fornication implied as couple lies in bed, and Viagra jokes; upper male nudity, woman in underwear, and couple lies under bed sheet after sex; alcohol; and famous athlete is mean to fans and selfishness rebuked.

GENRE: Comedy

Summary:

Although it’s a Disney movie about baseball starring a well-liked television comedian, don’t expect a kid-friendly movie out of MR. 3000. Dirty words and amoral attitudes about sex heavily mar the movie. It’s too dirty for children, but not edgy or funny enough for jaded adults.

Review:

Although it’s a Disney movie about baseball starring a well-liked television comedian, don’t expect a kid-friendly movie out of MR. 3000. Dirty words and amoral attitudes about sex heavily mar the movie.

Bernie Mac plays Stan Ross, a conceited baseball player who quit in the middle of the 1994 season, as soon as he got his 3,000th hit. All he was concerned about at the time was money and a place in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Later, as his unpopular demeanor kept him out of the Hall of Fame, statisticians discovered that there was an error in his stats and that he had really only scored 2,997 hits.

In order to reclaim his legendary status and hopefully get into Cooperstown once and for all, Stan Ross calls in some favors and convinces the Milwaukee Brewers to let him play again – 10 years after he deserted the team. Too bad Stan’s out of shape and is having serious trouble getting hit #2,998.

The premise is a clever deviation from predictable sports movies, but the script wastes too much time with subplots that dull the proceedings. Of course, Ross has a love interest, and he runs a bar, and he has to train, and he’s getting discouraged by negative press, but all of these threads distract from the heart of the story.

What’s really positive is the movie’s ending, at which point Ross has learned to look past himself. Possibly for the first time, he acts totally unselfishly and out of concern for others. The character’s growth is nicely demonstrated, and it’s meaningful for the audience.

Foul language bogs the movie down, and so does a lot of sexual discussion and jokes. This objectionable content will make it impossible for MR. 3000 to find an audience. It’s too dirty for children, but not edgy or funny enough for jaded adults. Even though the humor is a little dopey, the movie has some nice moments. Perhaps, it will lead to Bernie Mac being in some better projects.

In Brief:

MR. 3000 is a Disney movie about baseball starring a well-liked television comedian, but don’t expect a kid-friendly outing. Foul language bogs the movie down, and so does a lot of sexual discussion and jokes. This objectionable content will make it impossible for MR. 3000 to find an audience. It’s too dirty for kids, but not edgy or funny enough for jaded adults. Bernie Mac plays Stan Ross, a conceited baseball player who quit as soon as he got his 3,000th hit. All he wanted at the time was money and a place in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Later, statisticians discovered that there was an error in his records and he had only scored 2,997 hits.

In order to reclaim his legendary status and get into Cooperstown once and for all, Stan Ross calls in some favors and rejoins the Milwaukee Brewers – 10 years after he deserted the team. Too bad Stan’s out of shape and is having serious trouble getting hit #2,998. The premise is clever, but all the subplots slow down the story. What’s positive is the movie’s ending, when Ross looks past himself and acts unselfishly. He is a changed man.