OCEAN'S TWELVE

Stylized Caper Movie

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 10, 2004

Starring: Brad Pitt, George Clooney,
Matt Damon, Julia Roberts, and
Catherine Zeta-Jones

Genre: Suspense Thriller/Comical
Caper Movie

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13 for language

Runtime: 120 minutes

Distributor: Warner Bros. Pictures

Director: Steven Soderbergh PRODUCER:
Jerry Weintraub

Executive Producer:

Producer: Jerry Weintraub EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Bruce Berman,
George Clooney, Susan Ekins,
John Hardy, and Steven
Soderbergh

Writer: George Nolfi BASED ON
CHARACTERS BY: George Clayton
Johnson and Jack Golden
Russell

Address Comments To:

Barry M. Meyer, Chairman/CEO
Warner Bros., Inc.
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522-0001
Phone: (818) 954-6000
Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com

Content:

(PaPa, LL, V, A, MMM) Strong pagan worldview in which stealing is more profitable than work; eight obscenities and nine profanities, plus one scene with obscenities bleeped out; car explodes, and men stage a fight in public; no sex or nudity; alcohol use; no smoking; and, frequent lying, plotting and stealing, and married woman pretends to be pregnant.

GENRE: Suspense Thriller/Comical Caper Movie

Summary:

OCEAN’S TWELVE picks up with Danny Ocean and his band of expert thieves a few years after their Las Vegas heist. Not as good as the first one, OCEAN’S TWELVE has about 20 instances of foul language, no sex or nudity, and lightly glorifies stealing and crime.

Review:

OCEAN’S TWELVE picks up with Danny Ocean and his band of expert thieves a few years after their Las Vegas heist. OCEAN’S ELEVEN was one of the most exciting, tightly wound caper movies in recent years. The new one retains its stylized gleam but sacrifices much of the suspense.

The casino owner who got ripped off, played by Andy Garcia, wants his money back. He tracks down each member of the crew and tells them they have two weeks to repay. George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, and the gang figure they have to make another heist to pay off the first one. Their profile is too high in the United States, so they fly to Amsterdam.

In Europe, the gang meets with problems in quick secession: Catherine Zeta-Jones is a detective hot on their trail, one of their cohorts winds up in jail, and another thief keeps beating them to the punch. The odds seem insurmountable. Don’t worry – they have a plan.

Of course, the acting is relaxed and fun to watch, facilitated by quick dialogue. The cast has a natural chemistry that illuminates even some of the clumsier plot twists. There is less focus on a heist in this movie as character interactions move to the fore. The heist becomes almost an afterthought, and the pieces slide together too effortlessly for it to be very exciting.

Predictably, Steven Soderbergh’s direction is captivating, especially his camera movement and use of color. The movie is also paced very effectively so that it never gets bogged down or too slow.

In OCEAN’S TWELVE, the heroes steal and lie, and the ‘bad guy’ is the owner who wants back his stolen money. It’s a topsy-turvy worldview, but it is not presented as realistic; even young, unsophisticated viewers must be warned that crime is not a desirable way of living. The thieving lifestyle is still glorified somewhat, however.

Not as good as the first one, the good news is that OCEAN’S TWELVE is not as debauched as most movies in its genre (see the Content section for details).

In Brief:

OCEAN’S TWELVE picks up with Danny Ocean and his band of expert thieves after their Las Vegas heist. The casino owner who got ripped off in OCEAN’S ELEVEN tracks down each member of the crew and tells them they have two weeks to repay. George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, and the gang figure they have to make another heist to pay him off. They meet with problems in quick secession. Catherine Zeta-Jones is a detective hot on their trail, and another thief keeps beating them to the punch.

OCEAN’S TWELVE retains the stylized gleam of the first movie, but sacrifices the suspense. There is less focus on the heist as character interactions move to the fore. Heroes steal and lie, and the ‘bad guy’ is the one who wants back his stolen money. Even though this is a topsy-turvy, immoral worldview, it is not presented as realistic, but younger viewers must be told that stealing is not a desirable lifestyle, and really young viewers will be confused by the message of this movie. Not as good as the first film, OCEAN’S TWELVE has about 20 instances of foul language, but no sex or nudity.