PINOCCHIO

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Release Date: December 25, 2002

Starring: Roberto Benigni, Nicoletta Braschi, Mino Bellei, Carlo Guiffre, and Peppe Barra FEATURING THE VOICES OF: Breckin Meyer, Glenn Close, David Suchet, Topher Grace, Eric Idle, John Cleese, Eddie Griffin, and Cheech Marin

Genre: Fantasy

Audience: All ages REVIEWER: Dr. Tom
Snyder Many consider Walt
Disney's 1940 animated
classic, PINOCCHIO, the best
animated movie ever made, if
not one of the best movies
ever made, period. Acclaimed
Italian comic actor Roberto
Benigni tries to re-capture
that magic by going back to
the original source material,
in a live-action version.
Miramax Films has released a
dubbed version of Benigni's
effort, with American actors
and a couple British ones
lending their
voices. PINOCCHIO stars
Benigni as the mischievous,
inquisitive wooden puppet, who
wants, more than anything, to
be a real boy. Pinocchio comes
into the world as a
rambunctious piece of pinewood
that almost seems possessed.
The wood lands on the door of
poor wood-carver Geppetto, who
carves the wood into a puppet.
Geppetto names the puppet
Pinocchio. Immediately,
Pinocchio refuses to mind
Geppetto and goes out into the
streets, causing plenty of
mischief as he goes. The
police arrest Geppetto to make
him pay for the damages
Pinocchio has caused.
Pinocchio finally returns to
an empty house, where he
encounters a nagging cricket
who tries to get Pinocchio to
behave. Pinocchio won't
listen, however, and tries to
squash the annoying bug. The
Blue Fairy decides to take
matters into her own hands.
After a cat and a fox take
advantage of Pinocchio, she
tries to teach him to follow
the narrow path of
righteousness and common
sense. Eventually, her efforts
are rewarded, but not before
Pinocchio gets into a whole
lot more trouble, including
going to jail, being turned
into a donkey and getting
swallowed by a
whale. PINOCCHIO is
photographed wonderfully by
Benigni and Dante Spinotti,
the director of photography.
The movie astounds the eye
with its vibrant colors and
beautiful costumes, sets and
scenery. The story, however,
fails to create much sympathy
for the bereaved Geppetto, the
patient and forgiving Blue
Fairy or the rambunctious
Pinocchio. Pinocchio thinks
the cricket is annoying, but
Pinocchio is the one who may
annoy viewers the most. The
dubbing into English does not
help. Benigni portrays
Pinocchio as a petulant child
who hurts the people who love
him from the very beginning.
Only later, when the police
accuse Pinocchio for a crime
he didn't commit, does the
movie manage to create
sympathy for the injustices
afflicting him. PINOCCHIO
reflects the moral qualities
that have made this story one
of the most beloved of all
fairy tales. It rebukes lying,
laziness and rebellion and
extols hard work and obeying
one's parental figures. The
movie could have strengthened
the redemptive, Christian
aspects to the story, however.
Also, the movie's worldview is
slightly nominalistic,
suggesting that lesser
supernatural beings, people
and magical puppets can
manipulate reality. Please
address your comments to: Bob
and Harvey
Weinstein Co-Chairmen Miramax
Films 375 Greenwich Street New
York, NY 10013 Phone: (323)
822-4100 & (212) 941-3800 Fax:
(212) 941-3846 Website:
www.miramax.com

Rating: G

Runtime: 108 minutes

Address Comments To:

Content:

(Pa, B, C, V, M) Pagan, nominalistic worldview where beings can manipulate reality and positive moral elements about training rebellious children; a couple brief Christian references, including a blessing and an angel forms a rough cross on a tombstone; slapstick violence such as runaway log hits people, policemen accidentally pelted with fruit, schoolboys fight, one schoolboy throws a book and hits another boy on the head, people fall into ocean, and protagonist catches foot in bear trap; no sex or nudity; no alcohol, smoking or drugs; and, child is lazy, lies and rebels but is rebuked.

GENRE: Fantasy

Pa

B

C

M

V

Summary:

PINOCCHIO stars Italian comic actor Roberto Benigni as the mischievous, inquisitive wooden puppet, who wants, more than anything, to be a real boy. Though beautifully photographed, with plenty of moral lessons taught, this version of the beloved fairy tale lacks cohesion, is annoying at times and includes a nominalistic worldview which suggests that lesser supernatural beings and people can manipulate reality.

Review:

Many consider Walt Disney's 1940 animated classic, PINOCCHIO, the best animated movie ever made, if not one of the best movies ever made, period. Acclaimed Italian comic actor Roberto Benigni tries to re-capture that magic by going back to the original source material, in a live-action version. Miramax Films has released a dubbed version of Benigni's effort, with American actors and a couple British ones lending their voices.

PINOCCHIO stars Benigni as the mischievous, inquisitive wooden puppet, who wants, more than anything, to be a real boy. Pinocchio comes into the world as a rambunctious piece of pinewood that almost seems possessed. The wood lands on the door of poor wood-carver Geppetto, who carves the wood into a puppet. Geppetto names the puppet Pinocchio.

Immediately, Pinocchio refuses to mind Geppetto and goes out into the streets, causing plenty of mischief as he goes. The police arrest Geppetto to make him pay for the damages Pinocchio has caused. Pinocchio finally returns to an empty house, where he encounters a nagging cricket who tries to get Pinocchio to behave. Pinocchio won't listen, however, and tries to squash the annoying bug.

The Blue Fairy decides to take matters into her own hands. After a cat and a fox take advantage of Pinocchio, she tries to teach him to follow the narrow path of righteousness and common sense. Eventually, her efforts are rewarded, but not before Pinocchio gets into a whole lot more trouble, including going to jail, being turned into a donkey and getting swallowed by a whale.

PINOCCHIO is photographed wonderfully by Benigni and Dante Spinotti, the director of photography. The movie astounds the eye with its vibrant colors and beautiful costumes, sets and scenery. The story, however, fails to create much sympathy for the bereaved Geppetto, the patient and forgiving Blue Fairy or the rambunctious Pinocchio. Pinocchio thinks the cricket is annoying, but Pinocchio is the one who may annoy viewers the most. The dubbing into English does not help. Benigni portrays Pinocchio as a petulant child who hurts the people who love him from the very beginning. Only later, when the police accuse Pinocchio for a crime he didn't commit, does the movie manage to create sympathy for the injustices afflicting him.

PINOCCHIO reflects the moral qualities that have made this story one of the most beloved of all fairy tales. It rebukes lying, laziness and rebellion and extols hard work and obeying one's parental figures. The movie could have strengthened the redemptive, Christian aspects to the story, however. Also, the movie's worldview is slightly nominalistic, suggesting that lesser supernatural beings, people and magical puppets can manipulate reality.

Please address your comments to:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein

Co-Chairmen

Miramax Films

375 Greenwich Street

New York, NY 10013

Phone: (323) 822-4100 & (212) 941-3800

Fax: (212) 941-3846

Website: www.miramax.com

SUMMARY: PINOCCHIO stars Italian comic actor Roberto Benigni as the mischievous, inquisitive wooden puppet, who wants, more than anything, to be a real boy. Though beautifully photographed, with plenty of moral lessons taught, this version of the beloved fairy tale lacks cohesion, is annoying at times and includes a nominalistic worldview which suggests that lesser supernatural beings and people can manipulate reality.

In Brief: