PONTIAC MOON

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Starring: Ted Danson, Mary Steenburgen,
Ryan Todd, Eric Schweig, Cathy
Moriarty, Max Gail, & Lisa
Jane Persky

Genre: Comedy Drama

Audience: Adults & older teenagers

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 107 minutes

Distributor: Paramount Pictures

Director: Peter Medak EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Jeffrey Brown, Ted
Danson & Bob Benedetti

Executive Producer:

Producer: Jeffrey Brown, Ted Danson &
Bob Benedetti PRODUCERS:
Robert Schaffel & Youssef
Vahabzadeh

Writer: Finn Taylor & Jeffrey Brown

Address Comments To:

Content:

(NA, L, V) New age worldview -- professor teaches Darwinian theory as fact, & notion that personal worth can be attained by doing something perfectly; several obscenities; and, mild violence -- scuffle in bar.

Summary:

The tedious road movie PONTIAC MOON stars Ted Danson as an eccentric teacher in the summer of 1969 who decides to take his 11-year-old son on a cross-country trek in his 1949 Pontiac. Mediocre performances and a message that "goodness" can be obtained through man's own successful efforts contribute to this boring movie.

Review:

The tedious road movie PONTIAC MOON stars Ted Danson as Washington Bellamy, an eccentric teacher in the summer of 1969 who decides to take his 11-year-old son, Andy, on a cross-country trek in his 1949 Pontiac. Heading for Spires of the Moon National Park, their goal is to reach the park just as the Apollo astronauts land on the moon. The senior Bellamy believes the phobias of his emotionally-scared and frantic wife, Katherine (played by Mary Steenburgen), are beginning to affect their son. This trip, he hopes, will allow the two of them to bond and stave off the negative effects he sees surfacing. Meanwhile, Katherine, who has not set foot out of their house in seven years, suddenly faces her fears and takes off after the father-son combo. With little action and no suspense, the trio are eventually reunited.

Nothing about PONTIAC MOON works. This father-son journey is filled with worn out clich‚s and the usual cast of stereotypical characters. The acting is poor, and none of the characters has any depth. The cinematography is only so-so. The movie's message implies that "goodness" can be obtained through man's own successful efforts. Darwinian theory is endorsed. A few positives do exist (foul language is minimal and Danson turns down a barmaid who tries to pick him up), but they are not enough to redeem this lackluster movie.

In Brief: