STATESIDE

Choosing Lust Over Responsibility

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 21, 2004

Starring: Jonathan Tucker, Rachael Leigh
Cook, Joe Mantegna, Val
Kilmer, Ed Begley Jr., and
Carrie Fisher

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R for language, some
sexuality/nudity, and underage
drinking

Runtime: 93 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films

Director: Reverge Anselmo PRODUCERS:
Robert Greenhut and Bonnie
Wells-Hlinomaz

Executive Producer:

Producer: Robert Greenhut and Bonnie
Wells-Hlinomaz EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Selina Jayne and
Selina Jayne

Writer: Reverge Anselmo BASED ON THE
NOVEL BY: N/A

Address Comments To:

Samuel Goldwyn, Jr., Chairman/CEO
The Samuel Goldwyn Co.
10203 Santa Monica Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90067
Phone: (310) 552-2255
Fax: (310) 284-8493

Content:

(RoRo, C, P, B, ACap, PC, Ab, LLL, V, SS, NNN, AA, D, MM) Romantic worldview in which immature attachments are more important than health or wise choices, with a priest who forgives a boy for causing him to be paralyzed, Marines who do their duty by going overseas to fight, anti-capitalist elements related to politically correct class envy, and a brief sarcastic mockery of the priest; 25 obscenities and eight profanities; boy’s finger stapled by Marine sergeant and war wounds shown; fornication implied several times with several different couples, group sex implied which was possibly forced on the woman, high school students make crude sex remarks, students exchange sexually explicit letters, and a mother reads aloud one of the explicit letters; upper male nudity, girls shown in underwear before and after fornicating, full frontal female nudity in a strip club; teenagers drink alcohol frequently, often while driving; teenagers smoke cigarettes frequently, but no drug use; and, boy sneaks mentally ill girl out of hospital and drinking and driving not severely enough rebuked.

GENRE: Drama

Summary:

STATESIDE is an ill-executed melodrama featuring teen movie star Rachel Leigh Cook and a cast of recognizable but not immediately nameable young actors. Inappropriate for teenage audiences because of its extremely casual attitudes toward alcohol and sex, it’s doubtful that many people will have heard of this movie or will want to see it.

Review:

STATESIDE is an ill-executed melodrama featuring teenage movie star Rachel Leigh Cook and a cast of recognizable but not immediately nameable young actors. It’s about a privileged high school boy, named Mark Deloach, from Connecticut who enters the Marines rather than go to jail for a drunk driving accident. The day after his car wreck, a pretty, mysterious girl captures his attention. After a stint at boot camp, he returns home and finds her. As it turns out, she is Dori Lawrence, a slightly famous movie actress undergoing treatment for schizophrenia. Her mental illness makes their love affair complicated, but the new Marine is determined to make it work.

The young Mark is played earnestly and effectively by Jonathan Tucker. He is the brightest spot in an otherwise dreary movie. Mark is maddening, however, in his single-mindedness. He runs away from the Marine installation each weekend to see Dori. He disregards his training and responsibilities, in addition to her mental health and the treatment she is receiving, just so they can spend time together – time which is mostly spent fornicating. Eventually he proposes, so he does have some honorable intentions, but sneaking a schizophrenic patient out of a mental hospital so that he can seduce her is questionable behavior, at the very best.

STATESIDE is needlessly convoluted when the story is somewhat simple. It wears a soap opera aesthetic on its sleeve, which is borne out in the overcooked acting and plot turns. STATESIDE also suffers from inattention to production values, as it is officially set in 1980 but alternately seems to take place in 1945, 1965, and 1999. The editing is clumsy and sometimes inexplicable, as if the editor was intoxicated.

STATESIDE is inappropriate for teenage audiences, because of its extremely casual attitudes toward alcohol and sex, but it’s doubtful that many people have heard of this movie or will want to see it. A clumsy piece of melodrama, even the least sophisticated viewer would roll their eyes at STATESIDE.

In Brief:

STATESIDE is an ill-executed melodrama featuring teenage movie star Rachel Leigh Cook and a cast of recognizable but not immediately nameable young actors. It’s about a privileged high school boy from Connecticut who enters the Marines rather than go to jail for a drunk driving accident. The day after his accident, a mysterious girl captures his attention. After boot camp, he returns home and finds her. She turns out to be a slightly famous movie actress undergoing treatment for schizophrenia. Her mental illness makes their love affair complicated, but the new Marine is determined to make it work.

STATESIDE is needlessly convoluted when the story is simple. It wears a soap opera aesthetic on its sleeve, which is borne out in the overcooked acting and plot turns. STATESIDE also suffers from inattention to production values, as it is set in 1980 but sometimes looks like 1965 or 1999. Extremely casual attitudes toward alcohol and sex make it inappropriate for teenagers, but it’s doubtful that many people have heard of this movie or will want to see it. A clumsy piece of melodrama, even the least sophisticated viewer would roll his eyes at STATESIDE.