STEP UP 2 THE STREETS

Great Dancing with a Little Story on the Side

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 14, 2008

Starring: Briana Evigan, Robert Hoffman,
Adam G. Sevani, Cassie
Ventura, Black Thomas, and
Will Kemp

Genre: Musical Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 99 minutes

Distributor: Walt Disney Pictures/The Walt
Disney Company

Director: Jon Chu

Executive Producer: Anne Fletcher, Bob Hayward,
Meredith Milton, and David
Nicksay

Producer: Erik Geig, Jennifer Gibgot,
Adam Shankman, and Patrick
Wachsberger

Writer: Toni Ann Johnson and Karen
Barna

Address Comments To:

Robert Iger, President/CEO
The Walt Disney Company
(Walt Disney Pictures, Touchstone Pictures, Hollywood Pictures, and Miramax Films)
Dick Cook, Chairman, The Walt Disney Studios
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521
Phone: (818) 560-1000
Website: www.disney.com

Content:

(RoRo, B, C, PC, E, LL, V, S, N, A, D, MM) Strong Romantic worldview that deals with human emotion, love and the idealism of acceptance that deals with the present world as well as following one’s heart, yet with a moral tone dealing with family, love and self-sacrifice and one positive reference to God, plus one quick politically correct environmentalist element as guy wears T-shirt about global warming; 11 obscenities and eight light profanities; violence includes one sequence where three guys threaten, push, punch and kick one guy to warn him to stay away from a dance competition; light sexual content includes some unmarried kissing, some lightly sensual dancing with nothing graphic and some suggestive lyrics heard lightly in the background hip hop music; nudity includes naturalistic upper male nudity and young women seen in sports-top and dance clothes that reveal their midriffs and some cleavage; some alcohol seen in the background of a dance club; drug content includes woman takes some prescription pills; and, miscellaneous immorality includes lying, pranks being played on people, pranksters running from the police, girl tries to run away from home but goes back and two instances of vandalism of both private and public property.

Summary:

In STEP UP 2 THE STREETS, an orphaned teenage girl finds love and acceptance at an art school and in an underground hip-hop dance competition. Despite some shallow aspects and off-color moments requiring caution, STEP UP 2 THE STREETS has some thrilling dance sequences and positive moral elements that successfully entertain and inspire the viewer.

Review:

STEP UP 2 THE STREETS is the story of a confused teenage orphan who finds her place of acceptance as well as a family of friends in the hip-hop dance culture on the streets of Baltimore.

Andie (Briana Evigan), lost and alone since her mother passed away, is now being cared for by her mother’s best friend. However, when Andie starts skipping classes and running with the wrong crew, a group of hip-hop vandals known as the 410, her caretaker decides to give Andie one more chance at the Maryland School of the Arts (MSA). If Andie fails, though, she will be forced to move to Texas and live with her other relatives.

At MSA, Andie quickly finds herself at odds with the structure of ballet class and the rigidity of her instructors. Also, Andie’s 410 crew, who feel she has betrayed them for the MSA lifestyle, also ostracizes her. Lost and alone, Andie meets Chase (Robert Hoffman), the premiere dancer at MSA. She discovers that he too, along with many other kids at MSA, love hip-hop dance and long to start a crew of their own. Andie joins with them to get ready to dance at “the streets,” a dance competition that pits the best hip-hop crews of Baltimore against each other. During preparation for the competition, Andie finds love and acceptance as well as a new family of friends.

STEP UP 2 THE STREETS is a hip-hop spectacle that showcases the immense dance skills of its cast and choreographers. Marketed to and guaranteed to draw in throngs of young people, this sequel to 2006’s surprisingly successful movie STEP UP, plays like a cool music video. The dance sequences are thrilling and engaging, although sometimes they feel long and drawn out, not helping to advance the story.

The plot is predictable, the acting has little depth, and the characters are flat and one-dimensional. That said, audiences are not going to see Shakespeare here. In its goal to entertain, the movie is very successful. Also, the content is not overly salacious. The Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures have kept the filth out and the fun in this movie.

There is some light teen romance, however. There is also some sensual dancing, although not excessive and not prevalent, by any means. Also, some of the young women are clad in tight tops that reveal their midriffs and cleavage, so parents should be aware. Some miscellaneous immorality such as vandalism, running from the police and some “crew” violence is in the movie. On a positive note, there are some moral elements such as the importance of family, love and self-sacrifice.

All in all, STEP UP 2 THE STREETS has some cautionary elements, but it is a fun, engaging spectacle that has great dancing with a little story on the side. For a list of movies that have great stories and uplifting messages, please go to www.movieguide.org.

In Brief:

In STEP UP 2 THE STREETS, Andie, an orphaned teenage girl, is consigned to the Maryland School of the Arts (MSA) because she started to get involved with some hip-hop vandals. Andie finds herself struggling with the structure and rigidity of the school and instructors. Lost and alone, Andie meets Chase, the premiere dancer at MSA. She discovers that he too, along with other students, love hip-hop dance and long to start their own crew. Andie joins them to get ready to dance at “the streets,” a competition pitting the best hip-hop crews in Baltimore against each other. While preparing for the competition, Andie finds acceptance as well as a new family of friends.

STEP UP 2 THE STREETS is a hip-hop spectacle showcasing the dance skills of its cast and choreographers. The dance sequences are thrilling and engaging, but sometimes drawn out. Despite some predictable moments, shallow acting and flat characters, the movie entertains the viewer. There is some foul language and somewhat suggestive dancing and costuming. These things are kept to a minimum, however. There is a theme about following personal dreams, but the movie extols family, love and self-sacrifice.