THE BOONDOCK SAINTS

An Exercise in Ultra-Violence

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 21, 2000

Starring: Willem Dafoe, Sean Patrick
Flanery, Norman Reedus, David
Della Rocco, & Billy Connolly

Genre: Crime Thriller

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 108 minutes

Distributor: Franchise Pictures

Director: Troy Duffy

Executive Producer: Andrew Stevens & Ashok
Amritraj

Producer: Elie Samaha, Lloyd Segan,
Robert Fried, & Chris Brinker

Writer: Troy Duffy

Address Comments To:

Content:

(AbAb, HoHo, C, LLL, VVV, S, NN, AA, D, MMM) Immoral worldview that considers the possibilities of vigilantism in an ultra-violent, blasphemous manner, plus homosexual & Christian elements; at least 286 obscenities & 11 profanities; extreme violence including murdering criminals by shooting them in the head, many shootouts, cat accidentally shot to death, toilet drops on man’s head to kill him, beatings, man’s finger shot off, & gruesome image of corpse with eyes shot out; implied homosexual relationship & homosexual FBI agent dresses in drag to gain entry into Mafia house; upper & rear male nudity & upper female nudity; alcohol use & drunkenness; smoking; and, stealing, organized crime & extreme vigilante activity.

Summary:

In THE BOONDOCK SAINTS, two young Irish men, and devout Roman Catholics, in Boston become ultra-violent vigilantes who pray over some of their victims while murdering them. Despite the interesting moral questions this movie raises, it is just too violent, foul-mouthed and blasphemous a tale to recommend it.

Review:

The idea of the crime-fighting superhero has become a powerful cultural icon in America, especially since the level of criminal violence has increased dramatically since the 1950s. It inspires many people to feel like tracking down the local hoodlums and mowing them all down. Well, a small independent crime thriller, and PULP FICTION wannabe, titled THE BOONDOCK SAINTS has combined these two ideas to create an ultra-violent, foul-mouthed crime thriller.

Two young Irish men, and devout Roman Catholics, in Boston confront some Russian gangsters taking over their favorite neighborhood bar. They and their friends beat up and humiliate the Russian thugs. The thugs return to enact deadly vengeance, but the two men kill them first in self-defense. Exonerated by a smart, dapper, homosexual FBI agent who likes opera, they decide to clean up the town and go on a killing spree against the local gangsters. This leads to some significant plot twists that comment on both the theme of vigilantism and on religious issues of crime and punishment.

Despite the interesting moral questions this movie raises, it is just too violent and foul-mouthed a tale to recommend it. The violence and obscenities grow tiresome very quickly. Also, turning the two vigilantes into devout Christians who pray over some of their victims while murdering them smacks strongly of blasphemy. It makes the movie’s discussion of vigilantism, crime and punishment seem like just a cynical exploitation. It also adds to the anti-biblical and anti-Christian nature of this exercise in ultra-violence.

In Brief:

In THE BOONDOCK SAINTS, a small independent crime thriller and a PULP FICTION wannabe, two young Irish men, and devout Roman Catholics, in Boston confront some Russian gangsters taking over their favorite neighborhood bar. They and their friends beat up and humiliate the Russian thugs. The thugs return to enact deadly vengeance, but the two men kill them first in self-defense. Exonerated by a smart, dapper, homosexual FBI agent who likes opera, they decide to clean up the town and go on a killing spree against the local gangsters. This leads to some significant plot twists that comment on both the theme of vigilantism and on religious issues of crime and punishment.

Despite the interesting moral questions this movie raises, it is just too violent and foul-mouthed a tale to recommend it. The violence and obscenities grow tiresome very quickly. Also, turning the two vigilantes into devout Christians who pray over some of their victims while murdering them smacks strongly of blasphemy. It makes the movie’s discussion of vigilantism, crime and punishment seem like just a cynical exploitation. It also adds to the anti-biblical and anti-Christian nature of this exercise in ultra-violence.