THE BROWNING VERSION Add To My Top 10

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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 12, 1994

Starring: Albert Finney, Greta Scacchi, Matthew Modine, Ben Silverstone, & Julian Sands

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 107 minutes

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Content:

(C, L, N, S) Christian worldview demonstrating themes of redemption & forgiveness; 6 obscenities & no profanities; brief naturalistic male nudity; and, implied adultery, however regret is clearly demonstrated.

Summary:

THE BROWNING VERSION, starring Albert Finney, is the story of the relationship between a retiring British schoolteacher and one of his students as the teacher is forced to come to terms with the failures in his life. Other than the handful of obscenities sprinkled into the dialogue, and the subplot of adultery (which is only implied and portrayed as something to be regretted), this is an excellent film which focuses on the Scriptural themes of unconditional love and the redemptive power of forgiveness.

Review:

THE BROWNING VERSION is the story of the relationship between a young student and the retiring British schoolteacher who is forced through circumstances to come to terms with the failures in his life. The teacher, Albert Finney, discovers that his wife has betrayed their loveless marriage with a young American chemistry instructor. The one bright spot in his life is the fresh-faced admiration of young student who visits the instructor every week for one-on-one tutoring. It is through this relationship that the older man rediscovers the true value of human relationships, and thus learns to rebuild his own life and make amends to those around him.

THE BROWNING VERSION is a story driven by character revelations and decisions. The director Mike Figgis confidently guides his actors into a kind of underplayed naturalism, and Albert Finney turns in a skillfully restrained performance which is undoubtedly one of the finest of his long career. It is refreshing to see the Scriptural themes of unconditional love and the redemptive power of forgiveness played out in such a skillful manner. It is regrettable that the film is marred by the unnecessary use of a handful of obscenities sprinkled into the dialogue. Other than that, there is much to appreciate and be entertained by in THE BROWNING VERSION.

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