THE COOKOUT

Foul Mouthed Family Values

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 03, 2004

Starring: Quran Pender, Jenifer Lewis,
Meagan Good, and Tim Meadows

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13 for drug content, sexual
references and language

Runtime: 99 minutes

Distributor: Lions Gate Films

Director: Paul Abascal PRODUCERS: Shakim
Compere and Queen Latifah

Executive Producer:

Producer: Shakim Compere and Queen
Latifah EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS:
Mike Elliott, Michael
Paseornek, and John Sacchi

Writer: Jeffrey B. Holmes BASED ON THE
NOVEL BY: N/A

Address Comments To:

Tom Ortenberg, President
Lions Gate Films
4553 Glencoe Ave., Suite 200
Marina del Rey, CA 90292
Phone: (310) 314-2000
Fax: (310) 396-6041
Website: http://www.lionsgatefilms.com

Content:

(BB, C, Pa, LLL, V, S, N, DD, M) Pro-family and pro-moral worldview with prayer, and some brief permissive/immoral elements; 35 obscenities, eight profanities, three racial epithets, and some crude bodily humor jokes; comedic violence with people threatened with gun, robbery, and security guard crashes through window to stop crime; cohabitation, teenagers kiss passionately at high school basketball game, and brief sexual innuendo; upper male nudity; cigarette smoking and drug use; and stealing, fixation on material goods rebuked, and product placement.

GENRE: Comedy

Summary:

THE COOKOUT comes on the heels of hit urban comedies like THE BARBERSHOP. The story is simplistic, but there are enough good natured family moments and some funny racial commentary to make the movie entertaining, but be forewarned: the foul language is not for family consumption.

Review:

THE COOKOUT comes on the heels of hit urban comedies like THE BARBERSHOP. The story is simplistic, but there are enough good-natured family moments and some funny racial commentary to make the movie entertaining.

Todd Anderson is the first pick in the NBA draft, and, as success goes to his and his girlfriend’s heads, his parents try to keep him humble and rooted with family. A celebratory cookout is planned and his big family is invited, but when they start to distract him from signing a big endorsement contract, he has to decide between focusing on family or fame.

Todd’s social life is centered at home, so his parents know all of his friends and are deeply involved in his life and his decisions. When he moves in with his girlfriend, his mom tells him she’s disappointed and against the decision. The Anderson family members value each other as irreplaceable parts of their lives. A few moments between them are even touching.

It’s good to see family validated and greed exposed as empty and miserable, as this movie does. Problems occur when teenagers and a neighbor smoke marijuana, and when Todd moves in with his new girlfriend at the movie’s ‘happy ending.’ Still, the message is a mostly strongly one of anti-violence, anti-crime and pro-responsibility.

The comedy often works, especially with Tim Meadows. The slapstick scenes with bumbling robbers and Queen Latifah, however, are exceptionally unfunny. THE COOKOUT is good for a few laughs and a pleasant resolution, but be forewarned – the foul language is not for family consumption.

In Brief:

THE COOKOUT is simplistic, but there are good natured family moments and some funny commentary. Todd Anderson is the first pick in the NBA draft, and, as success goes to his and his girlfriend’s heads, his parents try to keep him humble and rooted. A celebratory cookout is planned and his big family is invited, but when they start to distract him from signing a big endorsement contract, he has to decide between family or fame.

When Todd moves in with his girlfriend, his mom tells him she’s disappointed and against the decision. The Anderson family members value each other as irreplaceable parts of their lives. It’s good to see family validated and greed exposed as empty and miserable, as this movie does. Problems occur when teenagers and a neighbor smoke marijuana, and when Todd moves in with his new girlfriend at the movie’s ‘happy ending.’ Still, the message is a mostly strongly one of anti-violence, anti-crime, and pro-responsibility. The comedy often works, but the few slapstick scenes are very unfunny. THE COOKOUT is good for a few laughs and a pleasant resolution, but be forewarned: the foul language is not for family consumption.