THE EYE

She Sees Dead People

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 01, 2008

Starring: Jessica Alba, Alessandro
Nivola and Parker Posey

Genre: Horror

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 96 minutes

Distributor: Lionsgate

Director: David Moreau and Xavier Palud

Executive Producer: Peter Block, Peter Chan, Doug
Davison, Mike Elliott, Roy
Lee, Michelle Manning, Darren
Miller, and Michael Paseornek

Producer: Don Granger and Paula Wagner

Writer: Sebastian Gutierrez

Address Comments To:

Jon Feltheimer, CEO
Lionsgate AKA Lions Gate Films (Roadside Attractions)
2700 Colorado Ave.
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Phone: (310) 449-9200
Fax: (310) 255-3870
Website: www.lionsgatefilms.com

Content:

(PaPa, OO, FR, B, C, PC, L, VV, N, A) Mostly mixed pagan worldview with some strong occult elements as woman sees and communicates with the dead including a ghost takes control of a woman’s bodies and many characters call another woman, who can see the spiritual world, a witch as well as negative, scary views of death and the afterlife, along with some light moral elements as woman rejects her own safety to try and save people’s lives, a Catholic crucifix hangs on the wall of a home, and one politically correct statement about the positive aspects of stem cell research; two obscenities and one light profanity; strong violence includes a lot of ghostly and frightening images, suicide by hanging, dream of a face burning, images of people burning, images of dead people being escorted by frightening “grim reaper”-type shadows, implied woman hit by car, and several other ghostly images including dead body floating in elevator, boy whose head looks bashed in and building engulfed in flames, a car crash, and glass explodes into woman’s eyes; no sex or sexual immorality; nudity includes blurred image of woman in shower and woman seen in night-top and underwear; alcohol includes woman takes one drink of sherry from the bottle; no smoking or drug use; and, nothing else objectionable.

Summary:

THE EYE, which stars Jessica Alba as Sydney Wells, is a remake of a Chinese horror movie about a young blind woman who starts seeing scary supernatural images after receiving a cornea transplant. THE EYE delivers only fair entertainment and has a mixed worldview with strong occult elements.

Review:

The new horror movie, THE EYE, which stars Jessica Alba as Sydney Wells, is a remake of the Chinese language movie, JIAN GUI. It is the story of a blind violinist who receives a new pair of eyes in an organ transplant surgery and gets more than she bargained for when the new eyes allow her to see into the supernatural world.

Sydney has been blind since she was five. Through the years, she has learned to use and trust her other senses. So, when she receives her new eye transplant, Sydney has a hard time adjusting to and trusting all of the new lights and imagery that she sees. However, Sydney also becomes acutely aware that she is seeing more than she should. Images of dead people, dark shadows that harvest the souls of those just departed, and ghastly visions of those about to die flood Sydney’s new eyes.

Sydney learns that her new eyes came from a young woman in Mexico who killed herself because she was terrorized by seeing into the spiritual world without being able to stop the death of people. Sydney decides not to suffer the same fate. Instead, she fights to stop the tragic deaths whenever she is able. Can Sydney convince those around her, though, to trust what she sees rather than think she is merely losing her mind?

THE EYES is not a terrible movie, but it’s not great. The movie follows some of the same shtick that makes all supernatural thrillers work: quick cuts of ghosts, brief images of ghastly murders, and a panicked young woman trying to convince everyone she is not crazy. There are some good moments of tension, but nothing new or creative.

THE EYE is not particularly bloody or graphic, although it does have some moments, but the worldview presented in the movie is problematic because it is a mostly mixed pagan worldview in which no character calls on the name of the Lord and the afterlife is seen as a frightening and horrible place with dark shadows that steal people away. By the way, the dark shadows that Sydney sees hovering over people about to die are probably the scariest elements of the movie, but the movie views these creatures as vindictive and evil. There are other occult elements as with another young woman who sees into the supernatural world considered to be a witch, and Alba’s character communicates with the dead, including one scene where the eyes’ original donor take control of Alba’s body.

All in all, THE EYE is decent but forgettable. It contains worldview problems, and most media-wise people of faith will avoid this movie in favor of more acceptable movies. For a complete list of family-friendly movies that have more acceptable content, please visit www.movieguide.org.

In Brief:

THE EYE, which stars Jessica Alba as Sydney Wells, is a remake of a Chinese horror movie. Sydney, who has been blind since five, has learned to use and trust her other senses. When she receives her new cornea transplant, she has a hard time adjusting to all the new lights and things she sees. Sydney becomes acutely aware she is seeing more than she should. Ghastly visions of those about to die and images of dark shadows harvesting the souls of those just departed flood her new eyes. Sydney learns her new eyes came from a young Mexican woman who killed herself because she could not stop the death of people. Sydney decides not to suffer the same fate. Instead, she fights to save the lives of those in danger. She can’t convince those around her, however, to help.

THE EYE delivers only fair entertainment. There are some good moments of tension, but nothing creative. THE EYE is not particularly bloody or graphic, but it has some scary moments. Also, the worldview is mixed, with strong occult elements but a heroine who endangers her safety to save other people’s lives.