THE FLINTSTONES Add To My Top 10

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Language        
Violence        
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Nudity        

Release Date: May 27, 1994

Distributor: Universal Pictures

Director: Brian Levant

Executive Producer:

Producer: Bruce Cohen

Writer: Tom S. Parker, Jim Jennewein & Steven E. de Souza

Address Comments To:

Content:

(B, L, S) A strong biblical worldview with several moral messages; one obscenity; and sexual innuendo which is rebuked.

Summary:

THE FLINTSTONES is one of those rare family films which thoroughly entertains you--whether you are 5 years-old or 50. The plot revolves around a villainous rock-quarry executive, Cliff Vandercave (Kyle MacLachlan) who wants to embezzle the Slate & Co. by framing the gullible Fred Flintstone (John Goodman) who eventually learns through it all that family and friends are worth more than money. THE FLINTSTONES movie is full of good moral lessons: from the Dictabird teaching Fred that you must read what you sign, to a clear message that you should be faithful to your spouse. The final word from reviewers James (11) and Evelyn Baehr (5) is "Yabba-dabba-see-it."

Review:

THE FLINTSTONES is one of those rare family films which thoroughly entertains you--whether you are 5 years-old or 50. Unlike most cartoons turned feature films, THE FLINTSTONES has it all together: fantastic special effects, humorous sets, endearing characters, superb acting, and a winsome plot. The plot revolves around a villainous rock-quarry executive, Cliff Vandercave (Kyle MacLachlan) who wants to embezzle the Slate & Co. Quarry by setting up a patsy Neanderthal executive whom he can manipulate into transferring funds to him and then staying around to take the rap while Cliff heads for Rockapulco. When Cliff tests the aptitude of the laborers, he finds his man in Fred Flintstone (John Goodman). Success goes to Fred's head, and he and Wilma begin spending money and friendships as if there were no tomorrow. The rest of this imaginative movie involves Cliff framing Fred and Fred learning that family and friendship are worth far more than money.

THE FLINTSTONES movie is full of good moral lessons: from the Dictabird teaching Fred that you must read what you sign, to a clear message that you should be faithful to your spouse. Regrettably, there is one obscenity in the film and some sexual innuendo which is clearly rebuffed. Otherwise, the final word on THE FLINTSTONES from reviewers James (11) and Evelyn Baehr (5) is "Yabba-dabba-see-it."

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