THE MEDALLION Add To My Top 10

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Release Date: August 22, 2003

Starring: Jackie Chan, Lee Evans, Claire Forlani, Julian Sands, and John Rhys-Davies

Genre: Action Fantasy

Audience: Teenagers and adults REVIEWER:
Eric Rice This colossal rip
off of so-many-movies-I-cannot
count will go down as one of
Jackie Chan’s hokiest films
to date. Borrowing from THE
MATRIX, THE GOLDEN CHILD,
CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN
DRAGON, many James Bond Films,
and SPY KIDS, THE MEDALLION
hardly has an original
idea! To make matters worse,
the editing is a little slow
on the humor, lingering a
little too long on each joke.
This may be needed for the
Hong Kong audience, but it
feels like a vaudeville show
where the comedians linger
after their lines, hoping for
some laughter. There is a
jerkiness to the filming in
some places that looks like
they could not decide what
camera speed to run. Sometimes
the action is sped up slightly
(common on Kung Fu movies),
and other times it is slightly
blurred, looking like they had
camera problems. Some stunts
that did not need wire rigs
used them anyway, and instead
of looking like “kung fu
fighters,” they kind of
lurched through the air like a
cheap Peter Pan production at
the local High School. The
music is just plain
irritating. Within five
minutes, it was clear the
composer was trying too hard
to illustrate every second of
the movie with not so much as
a breath of a pause. He also
borrowed from all the movies
that were borrowed from
visually, stylistically, and
thematically, so the music has
a stale feel. The story
proposes that once every
thousand years there is
“one” child who can put
together the two pieces of a
rare medallion which will
cause a new surge of good
energy and life, but should it
fall into the WRONG hands,
then it could be used for
immortality and EVIL! Guess
what? The medallion and the
boy fall into the hands of an
evil antiquities collector
bent on immortality and
surrounded by black
leather-wearing
henchmen. Jackie Chan is Eddie
Yang, a Hong Kong detective
working with Interpol who,
with character actor Lee Evans
(playing Arthur Watson) and
lovely lady Claire Forlani
(playing detective Nicole
James), must. . . blah, blah,
blah, save the world. . . you
get the picture. The only
interesting twist is that Chan
dies and is resurrected by the
young “wizard.”
Afterwards, he is immortal and
so he can run faster, jump
higher than before. Though the
resurrection thing is never
really explained, nor the
extra powers that resulted. Of
course, the bad guy, Snake
Head, (another unexplained
title) played by Julian Sands,
dies and is also resurrected,
thus equaling Chan’s powers
only in an evil, over-the-top
way. The movie tries at humor,
but in a lot of cases it falls
flat. The redeeming factor is
Evans (Mouse Hunt) whose
expressions and “prat
falls” steal every scene
where he appears. This movie
has Chan getting the leading
lady. The total lack of
chemistry between an early
fifties Chinese man and a mid
twenties English women could
not be more obvious. Claire
Forlani (playing Interpol
Detective, Nicole James)
strains to draw more out of
Chan than his nervous little
boy smile. Somehow, the
audience is expected to
believe they are
ex-“somethings,” and the
fire is re-kindled by fighting
a common enemy. Ha. The end
has (surprise), the two
immortals fighting to the
finish, where two creatures
from the medallion (Snake and
Fish) magically appear and
swirl around the evil man,
eventually turning him into a
character on the medallion
somehow. Nicole, after having
a “catfight” (complete
with cat sound effects) with
an evil Kung Fu bad-girl, dies
in the fray, and Chan uses the
medallion to resurrect her,
and they both fly off into the
sky (ala Neo in THE MATRIX),
leaving the little boy to walk
through a wall and disappear,
while the bungling detective
Watson stands with mouth
agape. Unless you are in the
Jackie Chan fan club, and have
to keep your membership
current by seeing every movie
he has ever made (est. over
120), you may want to avoid
this film like a
brother-in-law who owes you
money. Jackie has definitely
done better. The mysticism is
so stupid, any halfway
intelligent child over 13 will
find it “lame”. . . just
like the rest of THE
MEDALLION! Please address your
comments to: John Calley,
Chairman/CEO Sony Pictures
Entertainment: Columbia and
TriStar 10202 West Washington
Blvd. Culver City, CA
90232-3195 Phone: (310)
244-4000 Fax: (310)
244-2626 Web Page:
www.spe.sony.com/

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 78 minutes

Address Comments To:

Content:

(PaPa, FRFR, L, VVV, M) Heathen worldview with mysticism, chanting, Buddhas, temples, resurrection by mystic power, apparitions, supernatural power, everlasting life apart from God; only three mild obscenities; much fighting violence including shooting, stabbing, kicking, punching; no sex; no nudity; and, lying.

GENRE: Action Fantasy

PaPa

FRFR

L

VVV

M

Summary:

In THE MEDALLION, a rare medallion has the power to cause a new surge of good energy and life – UNLESS it falls into the wrong hands! With lame humor, poor chemistry and other hokey elements, THE MEDALLION might appeal only to the die-hard Jackie Chan fan club members.

Review:

This colossal rip off of so-many-movies-I-cannot count will go down as one of Jackie Chan’s hokiest films to date. Borrowing from THE MATRIX, THE GOLDEN CHILD, CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON, many James Bond Films, and SPY KIDS, THE MEDALLION hardly has an original idea!

To make matters worse, the editing is a little slow on the humor, lingering a little too long on each joke. This may be needed for the Hong Kong audience, but it feels like a vaudeville show where the comedians linger after their lines, hoping for some laughter.

There is a jerkiness to the filming in some places that looks like they could not decide what camera speed to run. Sometimes the action is sped up slightly (common on Kung Fu movies), and other times it is slightly blurred, looking like they had camera problems. Some stunts that did not need wire rigs used them anyway, and instead of looking like “kung fu fighters,” they kind of lurched through the air like a cheap Peter Pan production at the local High School.

The music is just plain irritating. Within five minutes, it was clear the composer was trying too hard to illustrate every second of the movie with not so much as a breath of a pause. He also borrowed from all the movies that were borrowed from visually, stylistically, and thematically, so the music has a stale feel.

The story proposes that once every thousand years there is “one” child who can put together the two pieces of a rare medallion which will cause a new surge of good energy and life, but should it fall into the WRONG hands, then it could be used for immortality and EVIL! Guess what? The medallion and the boy fall into the hands of an evil antiquities collector bent on immortality and surrounded by black leather-wearing henchmen.

Jackie Chan is Eddie Yang, a Hong Kong detective working with Interpol who, with character actor Lee Evans (playing Arthur Watson) and lovely lady Claire Forlani (playing detective Nicole James), must. . . blah, blah, blah, save the world. . . you get the picture.

The only interesting twist is that Chan dies and is resurrected by the young “wizard.” Afterwards, he is immortal and so he can run faster, jump higher than before. Though the resurrection thing is never really explained, nor the extra powers that resulted. Of course, the bad guy, Snake Head, (another unexplained title) played by Julian Sands, dies and is also resurrected, thus equaling Chan’s powers only in an evil, over-the-top way.

The movie tries at humor, but in a lot of cases it falls flat. The redeeming factor is Evans (Mouse Hunt) whose expressions and “prat falls” steal every scene where he appears. This movie has Chan getting the leading lady. The total lack of chemistry between an early fifties Chinese man and a mid twenties English women could not be more obvious.

Claire Forlani (playing Interpol Detective, Nicole James) strains to draw more out of Chan than his nervous little boy smile. Somehow, the audience is expected to believe they are ex-“somethings,” and the fire is re-kindled by fighting a common enemy. Ha.

The end has (surprise), the two immortals fighting to the finish, where two creatures from the medallion (Snake and Fish) magically appear and swirl around the evil man, eventually turning him into a character on the medallion somehow. Nicole, after having a “catfight” (complete with cat sound effects) with an evil Kung Fu bad-girl, dies in the fray, and Chan uses the medallion to resurrect her, and they both fly off into the sky (ala Neo in THE MATRIX), leaving the little boy to walk through a wall and disappear, while the bungling detective Watson stands with mouth agape.

Unless you are in the Jackie Chan fan club, and have to keep your membership current by seeing every movie he has ever made (est. over 120), you may want to avoid this film like a brother-in-law who owes you money. Jackie has definitely done better. The mysticism is so stupid, any halfway intelligent child over 13 will find it “lame”. . . just like the rest of THE MEDALLION!

Please address your comments to:

John Calley, Chairman/CEO

Sony Pictures Entertainment: Columbia and TriStar

10202 West Washington Blvd.

Culver City, CA 90232-3195

Phone: (310) 244-4000

Fax: (310) 244-2626

Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

SUMMARY: In THE MEDALLION, a rare medallion has the power to cause a new surge of good energy and life – UNLESS it falls into the wrong hands! With lame humor, poor chemistry and other hokey elements, THE MEDALLION might appeal only to the die-hard Jackie Chan fan club members.

In Brief: