THE ROAD TO WELLVILLE

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 28, 1994

Distributor: Columbia Pictures

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Alan Parker

Address Comments To:

Content:

(H, LLL, VV, SSS, NNN, A, M) Humanism; 24 obscenities; 4 deaths -- 2 natural, 2 by electrocution; adultery depicted, masturbation & frank discussions of fornication & sexual organs; full female nudity & partial male nudity; alcohol use; and, frequent scatological humor & implied vomiting.

Summary:

Turn-of-the-century health fanatic Dr. John Harvey Kellogg and his popular sanitarium, Battle Creek, are the subject of THE ROAD TO WELLVILLE, a broad sex farce starring Anthony Hopkins, Matthew Broderick and Bridget Fonda. The costumes and production design are impeccable, but ultimately, THE ROAD TO WELLVILLE plays like an upscale, yet still offensive, episode of BENNY HILL.

Review:

Turn-of-the-century health fanatic Dr. John Harvey Kellogg and his popular sanitarium, Battle Creek, are the subject of THE ROAD TO WELLVILLE, a broad sex farce starring Anthony Hopkins, Matthew Broderick and Bridget Fonda. Will and Eleanor Lightbody enter the sanitarium to revive their failing marriage. Will gets poked, prodded, electrocuted, and dissected while experiencing seemingly non-stop sexual arousal (that he does not know how to deal with) and receiving regular enemas from his sexy female nurse. "Battle freak" Eleanor discovers the joys of setting free her repressed Victorian sexuality. However, all ends well as they rediscover the value of their marriage.

The history of Dr. Kellogg and Battle Creek is certainly colorful and fascinating, but, ultimately, THE ROAD TO WELLVILLE is nothing more than a sophomoric sex farce. The costumes and production design are impeccable, and Anthony Hopkins gives a great performance and is nearly unrecognizable sporting big bunny teeth. However, the frequent scatological humor and references to bodily parts and functions are not nearly as offensive as the rampant use of the male and female bodies as objects of humor and/or titillation. THE ROAD TO WELLVILLE plays like an upscale, yet still offensive, episode of BENNY HILL.

In Brief: