THEN SHE FOUND ME

A Story of Relationships

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 25, 2008

Starring: Helen Hunt, Bette Midler,
Colin Firth, and Matthew
Broderick

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: ThinkFilms

Director: Helen Hunt

Executive Producer: John Wells, Chip Signore,
Louise Goodsill, Ralph Kamp,
Victor Levin, Walter Josten,
Jeff Geoffray, and Howard
Behar

Producer: Helen Hunt, Pam Koffler, Katie
Roumel, Christine Vachon, and
Connie Tavel

Writer: Alice Arlen, Civtor Levin and
Helen Hunt

Address Comments To:

Jeff Sackman, President/CEO
ThinkFilm
23 East 22nd Street, Fifth Floor
New York, New York 10010
Phone: (212) 444-7900
Fax: (212) 444-7901
Website: www.thinkfilmcompany.com

Content:

(BB, HH, Ro, PC, Ho, LLL, SS, N, M) Strong moral worldview with positive expressions of belief in God by heroine in a Jewish setting but with strong humanist worldview expressed by the heroine’s birth mother, a nonbeliever, along with a Romantic worldview overtone, plus some politically correct references about same-sex marriage; 10 obscenities and 19 profanities; no violence; depicted sexual promiscuity; upper female nudity (very briefly on screen) and females in underwear; drinking; no smoking; and, husband abandons wife, lying.

Summary:

THEN SHE FOUND ME is a moving story centering on April, a woman who must face abandonment by her husband, a new boyfriend and the discovery of her birth mother. While there is foul language and depicted sex, there is intelligent discussion about life issues, including belief and trust in God.

Review:

THEN SHE FOUND ME is a moving story centering on April, a woman played by Helen Hunt who must face abandonment by her husband Ben (played by Matthew Broderick), a new boyfriend named Frank (played by Colin Firth) and the discovery of her birth mother, Bernice (played by Bette Midler). The writing is superb, and the acting is very honest. The issues raised are complex and are dealt with intelligently.

April was adopted into an orthodox Jewish home. While she deals with betrayal by her husband and birth mother, she also copes with what she believes to be a betrayal by God. April gets peace about God, but in a slightly mixed way. She “understands” God a little more when she considers that God is “difficult” and “complicated” and “awful” just like she is. She then elects to pray at a difficult moment, showing that she does have trust in God. However, it’s still a mixed message, in that she is making God in her image instead of the other way around. However, the scene is moving nonetheless, and, in the character’s mind, she is expressing belief in God.

The value of family is highlighted and Ben walking out on the marriage because he “doesn’t want this life anymore” is properly depicted as being wrong. Ben is a negative character who refuses to grow up. April’s desire to have a baby is central to the plot. A key conflict is that April does not want to adopt a child since she herself was adopted and always felt to be less of a child to her mom than her mom’s own biological son. Adoption is shown ultimately in a positive light. The audience witnesses an orthodox Jewish marriage, funeral and a number of Shabbat celebrations. April prays traditional prayers in Hebrew before eating. While discussion of God is not pervasive, it is a central element to the underpinnings of the story.

This is not to say that there are no negative elements in the film. There is plenty of foul language, and there are number of sex scenes, though with nearly no nudity involved. Moments from a TV talk show, which Bernice hosts, discuss the pros of gay marriage. There is drinking of wine and other alcohol. While April looks to God, the other characters do not, and Bernice openly states that she doesn’t believe in God.

A central theme of the movie is adoption versus biological children. It serves to remind us, as the apostle Paul writes in Ephesians 1:5, that God has adopted us as his children. That alone shows the dignity and value of adoption. With extreme caution, this movie is an intelligent, moving drama about important issues.

In Brief:

THEN SHE FOUND ME is a moving story centering on April, a woman who must face abandonment by her husband, Ben, a new boyfriend, and the discovery of her birth mother. The writing is superb, and the acting is very honest. The issues raised are complex and are dealt with intelligently. The value of family is highlighted, and Ben’s walking out on the marriage is properly depicted as wrong. Ben is a negative character who refuses to grow up. April’s desire to have a baby is central to the plot. A key conflict is that April does not want to adopt a child since she herself was adopted and always felt to be less of a child to her mom than her mom’s own biological son.

This movie ultimately shows adoption in a positive light. Also, there is an orthodox Jewish marriage, funeral and a number of Shabbat celebrations. April prays traditional prayers in Hebrew before eating. While discussion of God is not pervasive, it is a central element to her story. Even so, the movie contains plenty of foul language and depicted sexual promiscuity, so extreme caution is warranted.