African Cats

Dangerous Pussycats

Content +1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 22, 2011

Starring: Narrated by Samuel L. Jackson

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: G

Runtime: 89 minutes

Distributor: Disneynature/Walt Disney
Company

Director: Keith Scholey, Alastair
Fothergill

Executive Producer: Don Hahn

Producer: Keith Scholey, Alix Tidmarsh

Writer: Keith Scholey

Address Comments To:

Robert Iger, President/CEO
The Walt Disney Company (Walt Disney Pictures, Touchstone Pictures, Hollywood Pictures)
Rich Ross, Chairman, Walt Disney Studios
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521
Phone: (818) 560-1000
Website: www.disney.com

Content:

(B, VV, M) Light moral worldview with little objectionable content about lion and cheetah cubs surviving various dangers in a park reserve in Kenya; no foul language; some intense fighting between lions, capturing and eating other animals, lions and cheetahs chase down other animals to eat them, older animals go off to die, and surviving scary attacks by other big cats, hyenas and alligators; no sex; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, some anthropomorphism of animals, predators try to deceive their prey, and very young children may be scared for the baby lion and cheetah cubs.

Summary:

AFRICAN CATS is a wildlife documentary about a lioness and a cheetah and their cubs, and the dangers they face living in Kenya’s Masai Mara National Reserve along the Great Rift Valley. AFRICAN CATS has an enjoyable, exciting narrative that keeps viewers captivated, but the threats to the young cubs may upset very young children.

Review:

AFRICAN CATS is a wildlife documentary about a lioness, a cheetah and their cubs.

Narrated by Samuel L. Jackson, the movie opens in Kenya’s Masai Mara National Reserve along the Great Rife Valley, on the border with Tanzania. South of the Mara River lives the River Pride, a pride of lions headed by an aging male lion, Fang. Layla, the pride’s lead hunter tries to protect her cub Mara, but she’s been injured. Meanwhile, north of the river, a female cheetah named Sita tries to raise three male cubs.

Both the River Pride and Sita’s growing family must avoid a second group of lions – a powerful father named Kali and his four sons. Kali and his sons are itching to take over the River Pride, and they keep testing Fang’s defenses. Sooner or later, the inevitable takeover will come, but can Mara survive the change in leadership? And, can Sita keep out of the way long enough to raise her own cubs to maturity? And what about the pack of hyenas roaming the area that would love to get their chops on the lion and cheetah cubs?

AFRICAN CATS has an enjoyable, exciting narrative that keeps viewers captivated. There are some lulls, however, that may cause really young children to fidget in their seats. They may also be upset by the dangers that the lion and cheetah cubs face. Of course, as with most babies, the cubs in AFRICAN CATS are absolutely adorable.

In Brief:

AFRICAN CATS is a wildlife documentary. Narrated by Samuel L. Jackson, the movie opens in Kenya’s Masai Mara National Reserve along the Great Rift Valley. South of the river lives the River Pride, a group of lions headed by an aging male lion, Fang. Layla, the pride’s lead hunter, tries to protect her cub Mara, but she’s been injured. Meanwhile, north of the river, a female cheetah named Sita tries to raise three male cubs. Both the River Pride and Sita’s family must avoid a second group of lions – a powerful father named Kali and his four sons. Kali and his sons are itching to take over the River Pride. They keep testing Fang’s defenses. Sooner or later, the inevitable takeover will come, but can Mara survive the change in leadership? And, can Sita avoid the lions and other dangers to raise her own cubs?

AFRICAN CATS has an enjoyable, exciting narrative that keeps viewers captivated. There are some lulls, that may cause young children to fidget in their seats. Also, the dangers the lion and cheetah cubs face may be upsetting. Even so, the cubs in AFRICAN CATS are absolutely adorable.