ALEX CROSS

Vengeful Cop Hunts Down Psychopath

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 19, 2012

Starring: Tyler Perry, Matthew Fox, Jean
Reno, Edward Burns, Rachel
Nichols, Giancarlo Esposito,
Cicely Tyson

Genre: Police Thriller

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 101 minutes

Distributor: Summit Entertainment/Lionsgate
Films

Director: Rob Cohen

Executive Producer: Steve Bocsi, Remington Chase,
George Furla, Stepan
Martirosyan, Jeff Rice, Ethan
Smith

Producer: Bill Block, Steve Bowen,
Randall Emmett, Leopoldo Gout,
Paul Hanson, James Patterson

Writer: Marc Moss, Kerry Williamson

Address Comments To:

le: ALEX CROSS
Quality: * * Acceptability: -3
SUBTITLES: None
WARNING CODES:
Language: LL
Violence: VV
Sex: SS
Nudity: NN
MPAA RATING: PG-13
RELEASE: October 19, 2012
TIME: 101 minutes
STARRING: Tyler Perry, Matthew Fox, Jean Reno, Edward Burns, Rachel Nichols, Giancarlo Esposito, Cicely Tyson
DIRECTOR: Rob Cohen
PRODUCERS: Bill Block, Steve Bowen, Randall Emmett, Leopoldo Gout, Paul Hanson, James Patterson
EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS: Steve Bocsi, Remington Chase, George Furla, Stepan Martirosyan, Jeff Rice, Ethan Smith
WRITER: Marc Moss, Kerry Williamson
BASED ON THE NOVEL BY: James Patterson
DISTRIBUTOR: Summit Entertainment/Lionsgate Films
CONTENT: (HH, B, C, LL, VV, SS, NN, A, MM) Strong humanist worldview of revenge and protagonist losing himself to hate, despite some moral and Christian content such as protagonist loves his family and will protect them at all costs, mention of a prayer meeting, and protagonist goes to an abandoned church for comfort; 11 obscenities, eight profanities; strong violence includes implied torture where a man cuts the fingers off a young woman, we later see a bowl full of fingers, hand to hand combat includes breaking bones, blood, explosions, and lots of dead bodies; a long scene involves the villain and a young woman undressing themselves and preparing for sex, but instead, he ties her up and tortures her, a depicted sex scene is interrupted by a phone call; upper male nudity, slight upper female nudity, woman in lingerie; light alcohol use; no smoking or drugs; and, protagonist is bent on revenge.
GENRE: Police Thriller
INTENDED AUDIENCE: Older teenagers and adults
REVIEWER: Ben Kayser
REVIEW: ALEX CROSS is an adaption of the popular novel series written by best selling novelist James Patterson. In it, Alex Cross (played by Tyler Perry) is a young homicide detective for the Detroit Police Department with a skill of hyper-observance. Because of his skill set, the FBI wants him and his family to move to DC so that Alex can do profiling for the FBI. This job would be more stable than being a homicide detective.
Everything changes, however, when a psychopath killer nicknamed Picasso tortures to death a young woman. It’s clear to Alex this was no random murder, but a planned assassination. Also, the murderer left a clue revealing his next target, a wealthy, heavily guarded businessman.
Alex and his team arrive at the target’s place of work to protect him, but he assures Alex his security is state of the art. Alex thinks that Picasso is already in the building. While securing the complex, Alex runs into Picasso, who then sets off an explosive and narrowly escapes.
Picasso is livid that Alex foiled his assassination attempt. He sets out to make it personal. (SPOILER ALERT) During a date with his wife, Alex gets a phone call from Picasso who’s perched on a nearby roof with a sniper rifle. Alex begins to psychologically analyze Picasso. He guesses what circumstances might have turned Picasso into a psychopath. This angers Picasso, and he decides to take it out on Alex’s wife who is sitting at their table. Alex realizes what Picasso is about to do and tries to save his wife, but he’s too late. His wife takes a shot and dies in his arms. Devastated, Alex decides to take the law into his own hand to stop Picasso before he murders anybody else. Of course, this is the classic structure of the archetypal police thriller where the police detective is forced to bend the rules to catch the criminal, whose attacks have become personal ones.
ALEX CROSS isn’t a great story. The characters aren’t really believable and the emotion they try to invoke feels forced. The action is exciting and has some intense moments, but it doesn’t make up for characters that lack depth. The content is about as rough as a PG-13 movie can get with some gruesome violence (including torture and cutting off of fingers), sexuality, and foul language. To make things worse, the protagonist chooses vengeance rather than justice. Though it is seen as a bad thing, he still chooses revenge and there are no consequences for his action. This leaves viewers with a humanist worldview with bad ethical ramifications, even though there are a couple minor positive references to Christianity, including prayer and church. MOVIEGUIDE advises extreme caution for ALEX CROSS.
Please send your thanks or concerns, and copy Movieguide®, to:
Jon Feltheimer, CEO, Lionsgate Films AKA Lions Gate Films (Summit Entertainment/Roadside Attractions)
2700 Colorado Ave.
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Phone: (310) 449-9200; Fax: (310) 255-3870
Website: www.lionsgatefilms.com

Content:

(HH, B, C, LL, VV, SS, NN, A, MM) Strong humanist worldview of revenge and protagonist losing himself to hate, despite some moral and Christian content such as protagonist loves his family and will protect them at all costs, mention of a prayer meeting, and protagonist goes to an abandoned church for comfort; 11 obscenities, eight profanities; strong violence includes implied torture where a man cuts the fingers off a young woman, we later see a bowl full of fingers, hand to hand combat includes breaking bones, blood, explosions, and lots of dead bodies; a long scene involves the villain and a young woman undressing themselves and preparing for sex, but instead, he ties her up and tortures her, a depicted sex scene is interrupted by a phone call; upper male nudity, slight upper female nudity, woman in lingerie; light alcohol use; no smoking or drugs; and, protagonist is bent on revenge.


Summary:

ALEX CROSS is about a homicide detective who goes up against a psychopathic assassin. ALEX CROSS is full of violence, some brief sensuality, foul language, and has a humanist worldview focusing on revenge, so MOVIEGUIDE advises extreme caution for ALEX CROSS.


Review:

ALEX CROSS is an adaption of the popular novel series written by best selling novelist James Patterson. In it, Alex Cross (played by Tyler Perry) is a young homicide detective for the Detroit Police Department with a skill of hyper-observance. Because of his skill set, the FBI wants him and his family to move to DC so that Alex can do profiling for the FBI. This job would be more stable than being a homicide detective.



Everything changes, however, when a psychopath killer nicknamed Picasso tortures to death a young woman. It’s clear to Alex this was no random murder, but a planned assassination. Also, the murderer left a clue revealing his next target, a wealthy, heavily guarded businessman.



Alex and his team arrive at the target’s place of work to protect him, but he assures Alex his security is state of the art. Alex thinks that Picasso is already in the building. While securing the complex, Alex runs into Picasso, who then sets off an explosive and narrowly escapes.



Picasso is livid that Alex foiled his assassination attempt. He sets out to make it personal. (SPOILER ALERT) During a date with his wife, Alex gets a phone call from Picasso who’s perched on a nearby roof with a sniper rifle. Alex begins to psychologically analyze Picasso. He guesses what circumstances might have turned Picasso into a psychopath. This angers Picasso, and he decides to take it out on Alex’s wife who is sitting at their table. Alex realizes what Picasso is about to do and tries to save his wife, but he’s too late. His wife takes a shot and dies in his arms. Devastated, Alex decides to take the law into his own hand to stop Picasso before he murders anybody else. Of course, this is the classic structure of the archetypal police thriller where the police detective is forced to bend the rules to catch the criminal, whose attacks have become personal ones.



ALEX CROSS isn’t a great story. The characters aren’t really believable and the emotion they try to invoke feels forced. The action is exciting and has some intense moments, but it doesn’t make up for characters that lack depth. The content is about as rough as a PG-13 movie can get with some gruesome violence (including torture and cutting off of fingers), sexuality, and foul language. To make things worse, the protagonist chooses vengeance rather than justice. Though it is seen as a bad thing, he still chooses revenge and there are no consequences for his action. This leaves viewers with a humanist worldview with bad ethical ramifications, even though there are a couple minor positive references to Christianity, including prayer and church. MOVIEGUIDE advises extreme caution for ALEX CROSS.


In Brief:

ALEX CROSS is an adaption of a popular detective series. Tyler Perry plays Alex Cross, a young homicide detective for the Detroit Police Department with hyper-observance skills. When a young woman is tortured to death, Alex believes an assassin is on the loose. The assassin is a psychotic man who goes by the name Picasso. At the murder site, Picasso leaves behind a clue about who his next victim might be. Alex must stop Picasso before he kills anyone else. Eventually, as in many thrillers, the case becomes personal for Alex.
ALEX CROSS isn’t a well-told story. The characters aren’t believable, and the emotion they try to invoke feels forced. The action is has some intense moments, but it doesn’t make up for characters lacking depth. The content is about as rough as a PG-13 movie can get, with some gruesome violence, torture, sensuality, and foul language. To make things worse, the protagonist chooses vengeance rather than justice. Ultimately, this gives the movie a humanist worldview, with bad ethical ramifications, despite some minor Christian references. MOVIEGUIDE advises extreme caution for ALEX CROSS.