AMADEUS - DIRECTOR'S CUT Add To My Top 10

Jealousy Kills Faith

Content -2
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 05, 2002

Starring: F. Murray Abraham, Tom Hulce, Elizabeth Berridge, and Simon Callow

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 180 minutes

Address Comments To:

Barry M. Meyer, Chairman/CEO
Warner Bros., Inc.
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522-0001
Phone: (818) 954-6000
Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com

Content:

(C, B, Pa, Ro, Ab, L, VV, S, NN, AA, MM) Christian worldview tainted by hedonism, drunkenness, Romantic elements, and angry statements against God and burning a crucifix; four obscenities and two profanities; moderate violence including depicted suicide and its after-affects; implied fornication; upper female nudity; alcohol use and drunkenness; and, jealousy, hatred, lying, and betrayal.


Summary:

With an additional 20 minutes, AMADEUS is narrated by the bitter composer Antonio Salieri who, confined to an insane asylum, tells the story of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the great composer who earns Salieri’s wrath. Without a needless scene of nudity, AMADEUS would be a classic study in carnality, loss of faith and the dark fruit of bitterness.


Review:

AMADEUS is the re-release of the 1984 eight-Academy-Award-winning film directed by Milos Forman. The music and sound have been re-mastered (cleaned up) and 20 minutes of additional footage added.
The story is one of music and jealousy, betrayal and bitterness. Following the last few years of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s life (played by Tom Hulce), it is a portrait of a divinely talented man inflicted with two major weaknesses – his ego and an unattainable desire to win the approval of his father.
Performing and writing by the age of four, Mozart was a “star” in Europe before his formative years. He performs before kings, popes and nobles. Upon entering Vienna, Mozart runs afoul of Antonio Salieri (brilliantly played by F. Murray Abraham), the royal court composer. In flashback, the aged, institutionalized Salieri tells a priest of how he became jealous and hated the more talented Mozart.
Mozart is unaware of this but seeks to please his father, who despises his son’s choice of wife, city and lifestyle. The movie portrays Mozart as a driven workaholic who, when not writing, riotously spends more money than he earns.
Salieri, once a devout believer, now creatively displaced by the younger composer, swears to hurt God by hurting God’s instrument of heavenly music, Mozart. He connives and executes one betrayal after another, finally destroying Mozart . . . and his own sanity.
The movie clearly shows that one can make a god of talent, and that bitterness left unhealed can lead to sickness, both physical and mental. It also shows that wounds left by performance-oriented parents can often be the most painful.
Rated R for nudity, the movie would be a PG without a needless shot of a topless woman. It is still a masterpiece of filmmaking, though the extra 20 minutes brought very little new light to the storyline of an already long movie. The sad loss of a man’s faith is hard to take, but does happen in real life. Nevertheless, the music, costumes, acting, and story make for a great movie.


In Brief:

AMADEUS is the re-release of the 1984, eight Academy Award winning film directed by Milos Forman. The music and sound have been re-mastered and 20 minutes of additional footage added. The story is one of music and jealousy, betrayal and bitterness. Following the last few years of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s life, we see a portrait of a divinely talented man inflicted with two major weaknesses – his ego and an unattainable desire to win the approval of his father.
Performing and writing by the age of four, Mozart performs before kings, popes, and nobles. Upon entering Vienna, he runs afoul of Antonio Salieri, the royal court composer. In flashback, the aged, institutionalized Salieri tells a priest of how he became jealous and destroyed the more talented Mozart. Rated R for nudity, the movie would be a PG without a needless shot of a topless woman. It is still a masterpiece of filmmaking, though the extra twenty minutes brought very little new light to the storyline. The sad loss of a man’s faith is hard to take, but does happen in real life. Nevertheless, the music, costumes, acting, and story make for a great movie