ANTITRUST

Mashing Malicious Motives

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 12, 2001

Starring: Tim Robbins, Ryan Phillippe, Rachel Leigh Cook, Claire Forlani, Dougleas McFerran, & Richard Roundtree

Genre: Thriller

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 120 minutes

Address Comments To:

Chairman or CEO
MGM/UA
2500 Broadway Street
Santa Monica, CA 90404-3061
(310) 449-3000

Content:

(BB, Acap, Pa, LL, VV, S, N, A, M) Moral worldview of man who exposes other man’s greed & dictatorship with some anti-capitalist elements against big corporations & pagan elements of characters doing anything to achieve material ends; 7 obscenities, 3 profanities, 3 exclamatory profanities, & some racial epithets; man erupts into rage, depicted scene of man being beaten to death by other men with video footage of the scene replayed repeatedly, man reacts to life-threatening allergy, minor explosion, man chased & knocked down by other man, & man & woman have loud argument; implied fornication & talk of how woman is paid to sleep with man; couple shown in bed together with only sheet covering them, upper male nudity & woman in bra shown getting dressed; alcohol use; and, lying, stealing & blackmail all rebuked.

Summary:

Ryan Phillippe and Tim Robbins star in ANTITRUST, a thriller depicting a software giant’s capacity to stop at nothing to be the first with new technology. Despite a mostly moral worldview, this movie contains foul language, a socialist anti-business perspective and other questionable material.

Review:

Tim Robbins and Ryan Phillippe star in ANTITRUST, a thriller depicting a software giant’s capacity to stop at nothing to be the first with new technology.

Gary Winston (Robbins) is the founder and head of NURV, a huge software company working to develop the technology for linking all forms of digital communication into one entity. Gary has already announced the date for the project’s completion, and is recruiting young college “geeks” who have the computer programming abilities to accomplish the task. He describes those in the industry by saying people are either a one, or a zero, a reference to binary computer code.

Gary is not the only one who wants to be a part of history, however.

College graduates Milo Hoffman (Ryan Phillippe of CRUEL INTENTIONS) and his good friend Teddy Chin (Yee Jee Tso), are working on developing the technology along with two other friends. Their plans change, however, when Gary presents them with the opportunity to work for NURV. Teddy, citing the manipulating monopoly of Gary’s intentions, immediately refuses. Milo, on the other hand, is curious to see what Gary has to offer. When he is told that he can be a part of something big, he decides to take the opportunity. Though this puts a rift between Teddy and him, Milo puts his own future first.

Gary takes Milo under his wing like a caring father, and Milo appreciates Gary’s fervor for success. When Teddy is found murdered, however, Milo begins to become suspicious and starts searching for answers. He finds out that there is another side to Gary. Behind the progression of the technology lies the digression of morality. Soon, everyone from Gary, to his girlfriend, to his co-workers are suspects.

ANTITRUST is a well-conceived movie, with an intriguing story of twists and good performances by Robbins and Phillippe. The supporting cast is decent, but some scenes are poorly done, bringing some laughs at the movie’s screening despite the serious point of the movie. Still, the main character is likeable because he yearns to do justice.

This fight to do the right thing gives ANTITRUST a mostly moral worldview. This is especially due to the fact that the movie rebukes lying, killing and blackmail not because of revenge, but because they are wrong. Foul language, a socialist anti-business perspective and other questionable material spoil these positive points, however.

In Brief:

Ryan Phillippe and Tim Robbins star in ANTITRUST, a thriller depicting a software giant’s capacity to stop at nothing to be the first with new technology. The head of a huge software company is working to develop the technology for linking all forms of digital communication into one entity. In fact, he has already announced the date for the project’s completion and is recruiting young college “geeks” to accomplish the task by the deadline. When one of these recruits finds out the heinous strategy being used to “be first” in the industry, he must find a way to thwart the villain.

ANTITRUST is a well-conceived movie, with intriguing story twists and good performances. Regrettably, some scenes are poorly done, which brought some laughs at the movie’s screening. Still, the main character is likeable because he yearns to do justice. His fight to do the right thing gives ANTITRUST a mostly moral worldview. This is especially due to the fact that the story rebukes lying, killing and blackmail not because of revenge, but because they are wrong. Some foul language, a socialist anti-business perspective and other questionable material spoil these positive points, however