ART OF THE STEAL (2014)

Brother vs. Brother

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 14, 2014

Starring: Kurt Russell, Matt Dillon, Jay
Baruchel, Kathryn Winnick,
Terence Stamp, Chris
Diamantopoulos, Devon Bostick,
Stephen McHattie

Genre: Crime Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 93 minutes

Distributor: RADiUS-TWC/The Weinstein
Company

Director: Jonathan Sobol

Executive Producer: Bob Weinstein, Jeff Sackman,
Noah Segal, Mark Slone

Producer: Nicholas Tabarrok

Writer: Jonathan Sobol

Address Comments To:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein, Co-Chairmen, The Weinstein Company (RADiUS-TWC/Dimension Films)
345 Hudson Street, 13th Floor
New York, NY 10014
Phone: (646) 862-3400; Fax: (917) 368-7000
Website: www.weinsteinco.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, LLL, VV, S, A, MMM) Very strong pagan worldview involving stealing; at least 85 obscenities and seven profanities, plus some crude banter; strong but limited violence includes a couple of car chases and fist fights as well as a hilarious motorcycle accident caused for a cheap payoff; implied fornication in one scene as man gets out of bed occupied by his girlfriend and sexual innuendoes and banter, including one character likes to tell dirty jokes, but the audience only hears part of most of these jokes; no nudity; alcohol use; no smoking or drugs; and, very strong miscellaneous immorality includes good-natured deceptions and plotting to steal and reproduce artworks, as well as the revenge, double-crossing, and lies as two brothers and their respective followers engage in a battle of wits to put each other out of business, and hero gets away with fraud.


Summary:

ART OF THE STEAL is a witty, clever heist movie starring Kurt Russell as a third-rate motorcycle stuntman who served time prison time for his brother and now wants revenge. Some clever twists, turns, and a superb cast make ART OF THE STEAL lots of fun, but it contains excessively crude language and a plot where stealing goes unpunished.


Review:

ART OF THE STEAL is a witty, clever heist movie about a third-rate motorcycle stuntman and his shady brother who lead a gang on a series of art heists before the stuntman realizes he has to get revenge on his brother. Despite its cleverness, ART OF THE STEAL has a strong pagan worldview and excessive foul language.

At the start of the movie, motorcycle stuntman Crunch Calhoun (played by Kurt Russell) is shown in a Polish prison. Crunch has endured a 5½ year prison sentence taking the fall for his fellow thief and brother, Nicky (Matt Dillon), on a huge heist. Nicky would have received a 20-year sentence for the same crime, but he’s not appreciative when Crunch gets released.

Instead, Nicky’s become even more shady. He’s not only engaged in a complicated plot to steal paintings but also to steal one of the world’s most valuable books. Nicky tries to get Crunch involved, but Crunch realizes Nicky’s constant thievery and lying have grown out of control. So, he decides it’s time for revenge and turns the tables on Nicky with his gang.

ART OF THE STEAL is great fun on an action and thriller, and even on a comedic level, but it could have been more enjoyable and reached a much broader audience without all the gratuitous obscenities and profanities. The cast is superb, with Kurt Russell delivering a classic star performance after being about seven years away from the big screen. Matt Dillon and Jay Baruchel also turn in top performances.

Altogether, the clever twists, turns, and lack of pretension make ART OF THE STEAL lots of fun. Sadly, the foul language is just too much. Also, the gang gets away with stealing at the end. So, most media-wise viewers will consider ART OF THE STEAL unacceptable.

Note: ART OF THE STEAL is not to be confused with the 2009 documentary by the same name.


In Brief:

ART OF THE STEAL is a witty, clever heist movie. Kurt Russell stars as third-rate motorcycle stuntman Crunch Calhoun. Crunch has endured a 5½ year Polish prison sentence taking the fall for his fellow thief and brother, Nicky (played by Matt Dillon). Nicky would have received a 20-year sentence for the same crime, but he’s not appreciative when Crunch gets released. Instead, Nicky’s become more shady. He’s engaged in a complicated plot to steal paintings and one of the world’s most valuable books. Nicky tries to get Crunch involved, but Crunch realizes Nicky’s thievery and lying are out of control. So, he decides it’s time to turn the tables on his brother.

Some clever twists, turns, and lack of pretension make ART OF THE STEAL lots of fun. The cast is superb, with Kurt Russell delivering a classic performance after seven years away from the big screen. However, the movie would be more enjoyable without the gratuitous crude language. Also, the hero gets away with stealing at the end. So, most media-wise viewers will consider ART OF THE STEAL unacceptable.