ARTICLE 99

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 13, 1992

Starring: Kiefer Sutherland, Lea
Thompson, Ray Liotta, Forest
Whitaker, John C. McGinley,
John Mahoney, Kathy Baker, &
Eli Wallach.

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults (especially, military
veterans)

Rating: R

Runtime:

Distributor: Orion Pictures Corporation

Director: Howard Deutch

Executive Producer:

Producer: Ron Cutler

Writer: Michael Gruskoff & Michael I.
Levy

Address Comments To:

Content:

(LLL, VVV, SS, M) 66 obscenities & 17 profanities; shooting rampage, destruction of property, woman kicked in face, man rams pickup truck through glass door, & bleeding eyes and teeth; crude references to genitals, sexual innuendo, & implied fornication; and, graphic view of surgery and corpses, patient requests euthanasia, breaking and entering, rebellion against authority, stealing medical supplies, & unethical professional practices.

Summary:

Frustrated by bureaucratic red tape, especially ARTICLE 99, a group of doctors at the V.A. hospital lock police and administrators out so they can operate on needy patients. The movie presents a flawed solution to ARTICLE 99: rebelling against authority by taking the law into one's own hands. Complete with profanity, violence, sex, and bloody operations, ARTICLE 99 unintentionally exposes the failure of socialism, though most viewers will only see it as a call for more government.

Review:

The hysteria surrounding Veterans Administration ARTICLE 99 is expressed by a crazed veteran, who rams his truck into the entrance of a V.A. hospital and shoots everyone in sight. ARTICLE 99 provides veterans with "medical benefits, however, as the diagnosed condition cannot be specifically related to military service, treatment is not available at this time." Receipt of his ARTICLE 99, after hours of waiting for medical attention, was the last straw for this veteran. Also disgusted with ARTICLE 99 are the V.A. doctors. They rebel by falsifying medical records and reporting one surgery while performing another. ARTICLE 99 climaxes in a 24-hour siege in which police and administrators are locked out of the hospital, allowing the surgical strike force to perform emergency surgery for the destitute.

While taking a stand for righteousness is good, breaking the law is not. Thus, the movie presents a flawed solution to ARTICLE 99: rebelling against authority by taking the law into one's own hands. Complete with profanity, violence, sex, and bloody operations, ARTICLE 99 unintentionally exposes the failure of socialism, though most viewers will only see it as a call for more government.

In Brief: