BABIES

Our Common Beginnings

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 07, 2010

Starring: Baya, Hattie, Mari, and
Ponijao as themselves

Genre: Documentary

Audience: All ages

Rating: PG

Runtime: 79 minutes

Distributor: Focus Features

Director: Thomas Balmes

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Amandine Billot, Alain Chabat
and Christine Rouxel

Writer: N/A

Address Comments To:

Jeffrey R. Immelt, Chairman/CEO, General Electric
James Schamus, CEO, Focus Features
A Division of NBC Universal and General Electric
65 Bleecker St., 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10012
Phone: (212) 539-4000; Fax: (212) 539-4099
Website: www.focusfeatures.com

Content:

(BB, H, V, N) Strong moral worldview of the wonder of birth and the development of children is highlighted, but light humanist quality because no mention is made of God; no obscenities and no profanities; minor violence among young children such as toddler bites another toddler, older child repeatedly hit younger child with scarf, cat is abused by child; no sexual content; much naturalistic nudity including mothers breastfeeding and naked babies and toddlers, plus upper male nudity when father washes baby in shower; no alcohol; no smoking or illegal drugs; and, nothing else objectionable.

Summary:

BABIES is a French documentary chronicling the first years of life of four babies in Namibia, Mongolia, Tokyo, and San Francisco. With almost no dialogue, BABIES captures the joy and innocence of babies, including a pro-life message, but please note that there is naturalistic nudity.

Review:

BABIES a French documentary chronicling the first years of life of four babies in Namibia, Mongolia, Tokyo, and San Francisco. Despite the diversity of culture and levels of materialism, viewers are struck by the babies' commonalities: wonder, need for nourishment, playfulness, vulnerability, and the struggle to stand and walk to independence.

Unity with brothers and sisters around the world sharing the common experience of childhood is a compelling message. There is a constant flow of smiles and laughter throughout BABIES.

With almost no dialogue or narration, the contrasting mix of similar growth patterns is what holds one’s interest. As the movie plays out, the viewer looks forward to the next victories of growth and awareness in the babies. The pictures of God’s creation in Namibia and Mongolia are awesome in contrast to the concrete worlds of San Francisco and Tokyo. The music enhances the images of the babies in their activities.

Despite the strong idealistic message of the babies' innocence and goodness, there is a reflection of humanity’s sinfulness and cruelty as one baby bites another child's arm, an older child repeatedly strikes an infant with a scarf, and a helpless cat is cruelly dragged around with a noose around its neck.

There is much nudity seen in the children and their breast feeding mothers. An adolescent seeing the movie may be fascinated with the naked bodies of mothers. Because they are presented in their natural context and without shame, however, the movie seems to have a strong message of the natural goodness of the bodies God gave us. In a world of pornography on TV and the Internet, “Gentlemen’s Clubs” and “safe sex” campaigns that exploit sexuality for selfish gratification, the movie shows human sexual gifts as a means that God has given humanity for creating and fostering new life. The joy and innocence of the babies plus the caring, nurturing love of their mothers make a strong pro-life statement against the horror of abortion.

BABIES does not mention God or religion, however. It does present an unblinking and endearing look at babies from birth to first steps. With an eye of faith, viewers should find God glorified in the babies and their loving mothers. One can’t help wondering when the inevitable violence and war was going to break into the four idyllic worlds. The movie is a cry of hope that each baby’s innocence and each mother’s love will win out over the lurking shadow of sin and violence.

In Brief:

BABIES is a French documentary chronicling the first years of four babies in Namibia, Mongolia, Tokyo, and San Francisco. Despite the diversity in culture and economic levels, viewers are struck by the babies’ commonalities: wonder, need for nourishment, playfulness, vulnerability, and the struggle to stand and walk to independence. Despite almost no dialogue or narration, the contrasting mix of similar growth patterns holds one’s interest. The views of Africa and Mongolia are awesome in contrast to the concrete worlds of San Francisco and Tokyo.

BABIES shows much naturalistic nudity in the children and their breast feeding mothers. An adolescent seeing the movie may be fascinated with the mothers. Because they are presented in their natural context and without shame, there is a strong message of the natural goodness of the bodies God gave us. The innocence of the babies plus the nurturing love of their mothers make a strong pro-life statement. There is no mention of God or religion, however. BABIES presents an unblinking, endearing look at babies from birth to first steps. With an eye of faith, viewers should find God glorified in the babies and their loving mothers.