BAIT Add To My Top 10

A Poor Catch

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 15, 2000

Starring: Jamie Foxx, Doug Hutchison, Kimberely Elise, Robert Pastorelli, & David Morse

Genre: Comedy/Police Thriller

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 110 minutes

Address Comments To:

Barry A Meyer, CEO
Warner Bros., Inc.
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522-0001
(818) 954-6000
www.movies.warnerbros.com

Content:

(PaPa, B, LLL, VV, SS, N, D, MMM) Mostly pagan worldview of some characters & law enforcement involved in corruption & schemes with some moral elements including man considers family & is a hero; over 100 obscenities including some on soundtrack & 6 profanities, depiction of two men held hostage & implied execution style shooting, man shoots man, depicted woman tied up, men run from aggressive dog, man has a seizure, man pulls other man up against jail cell bars, man punches other man, man pours burning coffee on hostage’s lap, men struggle resulting in man being shot in shoulder, horses & jockeys fall when startled, horse rears & kicks at man, man drives van through large screen in stadium resulting in large explosion, man shot numerous times, & many car chase scenes & depicted crashes; depicted fornication which is also heard by a group of people over a microphone & kissing; upper male nudity & couple fornicating under sheets; smoking; and, lying, theft, computer hacking, heartless manipulation, & blackmail.

Summary:

The comedy crime thriller BAIT stars Jaime Foxx of ANY GIVEN SUNDAY as a character used by federal Treasury agents as a lure for a killer. Containing an extreme amount of obscenities and profanities, a scene of depicted fornication and other questionable elements, MOVIEGUIDE® recommends extreme caution for viewers.

Review:

Director Antoine Fuqua directs rising star Jaime Foxx of ANY GIVEN SUNDAY in BAIT, a story of a thief used by the US Treasury Department to catch a killer.

Alvin Sanders is a petty theft criminal recently jailed for stealing. When he is placed in the same jail cell with a man who was an accomplice in a heist involving murder and robbing the U.S. Treasury Department, he is told the stolen gold is in “the Bronx Zoo.” Soon thereafter, the man dies, leaving Alvin as the only connection to find the real killer. He is questioned and threatened by the authorities, then thrown back into jail. However, the FBI has other plans for him, and, to his surprise, they let him go free.

What Alvin doesn’t realize, however, is that Treasury officials have bugged him so they can use him as bait to catch the killer, who is an expert computer hacker. Soon the killer begins to bite, and a battle ensues between the two. Alvin, caught in the middle, realizes he is bugged and begins to take actions on his own despite not knowing what is really happening.

BAIT lacks originality and flounders without a good script. Although Foxx can be fairly entertaining in comedic venues, he plays the racial card yet again for laughs, thus tiring an already overused theme. Reflective of his last comedy, HELD UP, Foxx’s abilities remain limited by the same role.

However, any comedy in this movie that does bring about laughs is marred by the abundance of foul language used by the characters and heard on the soundtrack. This, along with a moderate amount of violence and a scene of depicted fornication, makes BAIT somewhat of a disappointment, despite a few redemptive and moral story elements. Therefore, MOVIEGUIDE© recommends extreme caution for viewers.

In Brief:

The comedy crime thriller BAIT stars Jamie Foxx of ANY GIVEN SUNDAY) as Alvin Sanders, a petty theft criminal placed in the same jail cell with an accomplice in a robbery involving the U.S. Treasury Department. Soon the man dies, leaving Alvin as the only connection to find the real killer. To Alvin’s surprise, they let him go free, but not before he is bugged to be used as bait to catch the killer, an expert computer hacker. As soon as the killer begins to bite, a battle ensues between him and the authorities. Caught in the middle, Alvin begins to take actions of his own.

BAIT lacks originality and flounders without a good script. Although Foxx can be fairly entertaining in comedic venues, he plays the racial card yet again for laughs, thus tiring an overused theme. Regrettably, the comedy in this movie is marred by an abundance of foul language used by the characters and on the soundtrack. This, along with a moderate amount of violence and a scene of depicted fornication, makes BAIT somewhat of a disappointment, despite a few redemptive and moral story elements. Therefore, MOVIEGUIDE® recommends extreme caution for viewers