BEAUTIFUL THING Add To My Top 10

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Violence        
Sex        
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Release Date: October 11, 1996

Starring: Glen Berry, Linda Henry, Scott Neal, Tameka Empson, & Ben Daniels

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics

Director: Hettie MacDonald

Executive Producer:

Producer: Tony Garnett & Bill Shapter

Writer: Jonathan Harvey

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Content:

(HoHoHo, LL, V, SSS, NN, A, D) Strong homosexual worldview; 12 obscenities & 12 vulgarities; implied beating; several homosexual encounters between the two main characters; partial male nudity; alcohol use & abuse; and, implied drug-dealing & use

Summary:

BEAUTIFUL THING is a low-budget film set in the poor section of Southeast London. Two teenagers Jamie and Steve develop a homosexual affair as a result of personal problems. The movie inadvertently acts as a warning that man is fragile and can fall into homosexuality when faced with crisis. This movie contains implied physical abuse, alcohol abuse, obscenities, and a great amount of homosexual sex.

Review:

BEAUTIFUL THING is a low-budget homosexual film set in the poor section of Southeast London. Two teenagers Jamie and Steve are experiencing problems. Jamie can't fit in at school, and Steve lives with his abusive, alcoholic father. The starting point of the homosexual attraction between the two boys begins when Steve runs away from home and ends up sleeping over with Jamie in the same bed. Here, Jamie discovers Steve's bruises. Later, Jamie offers to massage Steve's bruises with some lotion which leads into the first of several depicted homosexual experiences. They two become inseparable, despite the displeasure of both their families.

The film is without question propagandistic. There is no way of getting around the immoral nature of the entire film. Common sense dictates that sex of any kind isn't medicinal or a solution to pain. In seeking comfort and healing for these wound, Steve finds himself trying to satisfy his needs through an unholy relationship. The movie inadvertently acts as a warning that man is fragile and can fall into homosexuality when faced with crisis. It seems to suggest that homosexual behaviors are a legitimate escape from physical abuse. This movie contains implied physical abuse, alcohol abuse, obscenities, and a great amount of homosexual sex.

In Brief: