BEAUTY SHOP Add To My Top 10

Businesswoman Finds Success

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 30, 2005

Starring: Queen Latifah, Alicia Silverstone, Djimon Hounsou, Alfre Woodard, Andie McDowell, Mena Suvari, and Kevin Bacon

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 105 minutes

Address Comments To:

Kirk Kerkorian, CEO
Alex Yemenidjian, Chairman
MGM
2500 Broadway Street
Santa Monica, CA 90404-3061
Phone: (310) 449-3000
Fax: (310) 449-3024

Content:

(BB, CapCapCap, Pa, Ho, PC, Fe, C, FR, LLL, S, N, V, M) Strong moral worldview with very strong pro-capitalist messages that also rebuke abuse of governmental authority, brief talk about going to church and some pagan content, including comical subplot with homosexual references about one male hairdresser’s possible sexual orientation and another hairdresser is effeminate, and some mildly politically correct, racial identity attitudes, plus some feminist implications (nothing particularly radical or overtly offensive, however), as well as one oblique reference to Black Muslim; at least 48 mostly light obscenities (two or three “s” words), seven light exclamatory profanities, someone says, “Lord Jesus, have mercy,” and racial slur rebuked, as is the saying of “Ho” for whore; brief comic violence includes shop owner kicks boy out of beauty shop for being disrespectful to women and men grab comical villain with intent to cut his long hair; no sex scenes but some brief dirty dancing, French kissing, some oblique sexual innuendoes (mostly about women getting sexual pleasure in “Hot-lanta” in Georgia), and references to being homosexual; no nudity, but some female cleavage and talk about woman’s plastic surgery to increase her breasts; alcohol use; no smoking; and, bribery rebuked.

Summary:

BEAUTY SHOP stars Queen Latifah as Gina, the hairdresser from BARBERSHOP 2, who has moved to Atlanta, where she has trouble making a go of her own hairdressing salon. BEAUTY SHOP is a bold, brassy comedy, but the script is very lightweight, and there are about 50 mostly light obscenities, plus some sexual innuendoes.

Review:

BEAUTY SHOP picks up Queen Latifah’s Gina character from BARBERSHOP 2. In the new film, Gina has moved to Atlanta, where she works for an effeminate German hairdresser calling himself Jorge. Gina and Jorge are like oil and water, however. Gina particularly doesn’t get along with Jorge’s condescending, bossy attitude. She soon quits his place to start her own beauty shop.

Jorge gets upset as Gina’s shop begins to take away some of his customers. One of the customers offers to sell Gina’s special conditioning formula to a big-name company. Her offer comes just in time, because Gina is having trouble making ends meet due to an over-zealous state inspector. When the woman gets into an argument with one of Gina’s hairdressers, Gina refuses to fire her, and the woman stops helping Gina sell her formula. Gina’s situation becomes dire, until a couple of surprising twists set everything right.

BEAUTY SHOP is a bold, brassy comedy, and Queen Latifah plays her character to the hilt. Much of the comedy is derived from the interaction among Gina’s motley crew of hairdressers and her customers. The script is very lightweight, however, except for about 50 mostly light obscenities and some oblique sexual innuendoes, mostly centered on female sexual pleasure (see the CONTENT section above for more details). The movie also contains some comical homosexual references as the female hairdressers debate the apparent sexual orientation of the lone male hairdresser in Gina’s shop. This content is played for laughs, but there is no condemnation of homosexual behavior or the radical idea of sexual orientation in today’s degraded Kinseyan culture.

In Brief:

BEAUTY SHOP picks up Queen Latifah’s Gina character from BARBERSHOP 2. In the new film, Gina has moved to Atlanta, where she works for an effeminate, condescending German hairdresser calling himself Jorge. Gina soon quits to start her own beauty shop. Jorge gets upset as Gina begins to take some of his customers. One of the customers offers to sell Gina’s special conditioning formula to a big-name company. Her offer comes just in time, because Gina is having trouble making ends meet. The woman gets into an argument with one of Gina’s hairdressers. Gina refuses to fire her, so the woman stops helping Gina sell her formula. Gina’s situation becomes dire, until a couple surprising twists set everything right.

BEAUTY SHOP is a bold, brassy comedy, and Queen Latifah plays her character to the hilt. Much of the comedy is derived from the interaction among Gina’s motley crew of hairdressers and her customers. The script is very light, however, except for about 50 mostly light obscenities and some sexual innuendoes. The movie also contains some homosexual references as the female hairdressers debate the apparent sexual orientation of the lone male hairdresser in Gina’s shop.