BOOMERANG

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 01, 1992

Distributor: Paramount Pictures

Director: Reginald Hudlin

Executive Producer:

Producer: Barry W. Blaustein & David Sheffield

Writer: Brian Grazer

Address Comments To:

Content:

(LLL, V, SSS, NN, Homo, A/D, Ab, M) 51 obscenities & 3 profanities; slapping man in face & hitting man in eye; explicit fornication, woman takes off underwear and rubs it in old man's face, woman exposes herself in restaurant, masturbation, sadomasochism, woman rips clothes off, phallic symbols, crude references to genitalia & fellatio, jokes about homosexuality and transvestism, sexual harassment, endless sexual colloquialisms and puns, women in underwear, woman gives birth to perfume bottle in commercial, grotesque mural of orgy, & pornographic sketch & ads; repeated rear, near & shadow nudity; alcohol consumption; newspaper headline reads "Is God dead?" & anti-biblical remarks; and, lying, deception, & racial slurs.


Summary:

After the roles are reversed, Marcus Graham (Eddie Murphy) reconsiders his "love`em and leave`em" philosophy and settles down to a monogamous relationship in BOOMERANG. The film's preoccupation with fornication overshadows its case for one man-one woman relationship. As Eddie Murphy's comeback attempt, BOOMERANG does not give him the story to establish a compelling identity. Also, the language is filled with sexual colloquialisms and puns, reenforcing racial stereotypes of the basest kind.


Review:

After the roles are reversed, Marcus Graham (Eddie Murphy) reconsiders his Casanova philosophy and settles down to a monogamous relationship in BOOMERANG. However, BOOMERANG's preoccupation with fornication overshadows its case for monogamy. The story begins at a New York cosmetics firm where Marcus works as a marketing executive. When his firm merges with LADY ELOISE, Marcus fornicates with the elderly founder so he can move up the corporate ranks. At work, he discovers his real boss is Jacqueline Broyer. Jacqueline is too smart for Marcus's con games. When they end up in bed together on a New Orleans business trip, the roles are reversed, and he falls in love while she loses interest.
BOOMERANG romanticizes an oversexed journey filled with explicit fornication, nudity sexual innuendo. As Eddie Murphy's comeback attempt, BOOMERANG does not give him the story to establish a compelling identity. Furthermore, the scatological humor wears thin, while the language is filled with sexual colloquialisms, reenforcing racial stereotypes of the basest kind. In all, BOOMERANG fails as a movie, but may capture an audience in a summer devoid of comedies.


In Brief: