BRIDE FLIGHT Add To My Top 10

Plodding Relationship Drama

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 10, 2011

Distributor: Music Box Films

Director: Ben Sombogaart

Executive Producer: None Listed

Producer: Hanneke Niens, Anton Smit

Writer: Marieke van der Pol

Address Comments To:

William Schopf, President
Music Box Films
942 W. Lake Street
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 492-9364
Website: musicboxfilms.com

Content:

(RoRo, AbAb, B, C, Fe, FR, Pa, L, VV, SS, NNN, A, D, MM) Strong Romantic worldview overall with immoral anti-biblical behavior throughout as well as a strongly negative view of a religious husband as jealous and close-minded and a woman daydreams about another man during her wedding ceremony, but some moral and religious characters depicted, Scripture quoted, a Christian wedding, and Jewish practices depicted, feminist character decries religious tradition, and mention of a Greek goddess; four obscenities and two profanities; some intense and light violence includes a mild car accident as man has heart attack while driving, an elderly woman collapses, punching, kicking, gun shot, a woman loses her child during pregnancy, another woman mentions abortion, woman screams during labor, husband grabs his wife forcefully because she rejects him sexually, and a story of suicide; strong sexual content includes depicted adultery, several instances of implied fornication, sexual dialogue, unmarried kissing, woman admits to getting pregnant out of wedlock, married kissing, groping, single mother gives her baby away to a friend unable to have children; full female nudity, upper female nudity, upper male nudity; alcohol use depicted and man owns a wine vineyard; cigarette smoking throughout the movie; and, lying, jealousy and very immoral characters throughout.


Summary:

BRIDE FLIGHT is a character-driven story from the Netherlands of three women and how their lives are forever intertwined because of their relationship with Frank, whom they all met on a shared flight from Holland to New Zealand after WW II. Though beautifully shot, BRIDE FLIGHT is a plodding relationship drama that’s largely uninteresting, with no rewarding finish, explicit obscene content and a Romantic worldview with a very negative view of one woman’s Christian husband.


Review:

BRIDE FLIGHT is a character-driven story from the Netherlands of three women, Ada, Esther and Marjorie, and how their lives are forever intertwined because of their relationship with Frank, whom they all met on a shared flight from Holland to New Zealand after WW II. The story intercuts between contemporary times as the three women reunite at Frank’s funeral and flashbacks of when they left Europe as war brides to settle in New Zealand.
The three women board the Flying Dutchman on its record-breaking flight from Holland to New Zealand. Ada is going to meet up with her soon-to-be husband. He’s a devout, reformed Christian who sinned with Ada and impregnated her. Now, he wants to fly her down to make an honest woman of her. Ada is nervous she will not find happiness with his guilt-ridden religious fervor. On the flight, she sits beside Frank, and his passion for life inspires Ada and makes her question her pending nuptials.
Meanwhile, Marjorie is headed to meet up with the man of her dreams, and Esther is going to open up a store of designer clothing. However, their various lives are not without pain of their own. Marjorie is unable to bear children, and Esther cannot find a love of her own. One night, Esther and Frank have a drunken affair, and Esther becomes pregnant. To ease Marjorie’s pain, she gives the newborn to Marjorie and her husband, who adopt the little one.
[SPOILERS ALERT] As the years pass, Ada and Frank’s love goes unrequited, Esther feels disconnected from her daughter, and Marjorie becomes overly protective of her adopted daughter’s love. The man who draws the women’s friendship together is the same man who seems to be tearing them apart. When they meet again at Frank’s funeral, they are able to look back and celebrate their complicated history together.
Though beautifully shot, BRIDE FLIGHT is a plodding relationship drama that’s largely uninteresting. The pace is slow, which is fitting for this particular character-driven piece, but the characters are not dynamic. The movie becomes a wearisome tale with no character growth and no rewarding finish.
The movie also has strong sexual content and explicit nudity. It also has a largely mixed, Romantic worldview with immoral relationships and a very negative view of Ada’s husband as a repressive Christian. Finally, BRIDE FLIGHT has brief intense violence and brief foul language, along with miscellaneous immoral behavior such as lying and jealousy.


In Brief:

BRIDE FLIGHT is a character-driven story from the Netherlands. Three women board the Flying Dutchman on its record-breaking flight from Holland to New Zealand after World War II. Ada’s meeting her soon-to-be husband, a devout, reformed Christian who sinned and impregnated her. Now, he’s flying her down to make an honest woman of her. On the flight, she sits beside Frank. Frank’s passion for life inspires Ada and makes her question her pending nuptials. Meanwhile, Marjorie is headed to meet up with the man of her dreams, and Esther is going to open up a designer clothing store. Marjorie is unable to bear children, so when Esther becomes pregnant from a drunken encounter with Frank, she gives the baby to Marjorie and her husband, who adopt the baby. As years pass by, the women look back on how Frank impacted their lives.
Though beautifully shot, BRIDE FLIGHT is a plodding relationship drama that’s largely uninteresting, with no rewarding finish. The movie contains strong sexual content, explicit nudity and a Romantic worldview with a very negative view of the first woman’s Christian husband. Media-wise viewers probably will not like BRIDE FLIGHT.