BRIGHT ANGEL Add To My Top 10

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Violence        
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Release Date: June 14, 1991

Distributor: Hemdale Pictures

Director: Michael Fields

Executive Producer:

Producer: John Daly, Derek Gibson, Paige Simpson & Robert Maclean

Writer: Richard Ford

Address Comments To:

Hemdale Films
1118 N. Wetherly Dr.
Los Angeles, CA 90069
(213) 550-6894

Content:

(LLL, N, V, S, A/D) 30 obscenities, 6 profanities; brief violence; female nudity; adultery & implied rape; and, alcohol use.

Summary:

With its evocative photography, BRIGHT ANGEL pointlessly guides you through the underbelly of the Midwest with a collection of losers that you wouldn't waste your time with in real life. The half-baked story focuses on George, an impressionable teenager, who travels the Midwest with Lucy who is trying to liberate her imprisoned brother.

Review:

With its evocative photography, low budget BRIGHT ANGEL pointlessly guides you through the underbelly of the Midwest with a collection of losers that you wouldn't waste your time with in real life. The story focuses on George, an impressionable teenager whose life is as barren as the prairie surrounding his home in Great Falls, Montana. George's father, Jack, works at the railroad and illegally keeps a poaching business on the side. One day, he comes home to find his wife consorting with a soldier. Feeling angry, he brandishes a gun as Mom packs up to leave.

George realizes that his family doesn't have much of a future. Pondering his fate at a local diner, George runs into his friends, Claude and Lucy.

Lucy coaxes George into driving her to Casper, Wyoming, where she wants to help her imprisoned brother with cash "borrowed" from her dad. Since George's aunt lives nearby, he decides to go. Claude comes along for the ride, but after cursing and taunting them from the back seat, he is left at the road side.

George and Lucy visit Aunt Judy, a nice lady with an eccentric, wheelchair-bound, eccentric husband who is capable of murder. Lucy's brother instructs her to make a payoff to a couple of local hoods, bribing the key witness at his upcoming trial with $600 if he will leave town immediately.

Awkwardly, George sprouts sexual feelings about Lucy. His romantic feelings and new lifestyle are way over his head, however, as guns and double-crosses appear out of nowhere, and people die, although George narrowly escapes.

Has George learned anything? Not really. Sadder rather than wiser, he wanders into another bizarre situation as the film ends. Stopping mid-sentence, the film doesn't have an ending. Viewers are left dumbfounded about the lack of closure after enduring this 90-minute low-life travelogue.

The film is said by producer Paige MacLean and director Michael Woods to resonate with truth, but this simply isn't the case. George experiences no growth or change after his ordeal. Lucy utters a lot of provocative comments and pseudo-profundities that neither George, nor the audience can figure out.

BRIGHT STAR vividly illustrates a theology of total depravity without Christ. More aptly titled DARK ANGEL, the film is negligent in providing a solution to "walking dead man's syndrome." Truthfully, this film would have taken a different turn if peppered with a little irresistible grace. Pray that the filmmakers will be smitten with conviction amidst their existentialist darkness, accepting the deliverance of the Sovereign Lord by acknowledging Him as their shining Light, Who guides and directs life's paths.

In Brief:

With its evocative photography, low budget BRIGHT ANGEL pointlessly guides you through the underbelly of the Midwest with a collection of losers. George is an impressionable teenager living in Montana. George's father comes home one day to find his wife consorting with a soldier and brandishes a gun as Mom packs up to leave. George realizes his family doesn't have a future. His friend Lucy coaxes George into driving her to Casper, Wyoming, where she wants to help her imprisoned brother. Since George's aunt lives nearby, he decides to go. Lucy's brother instructs her to bribe the key witness if he will leave town immediately. However, guns appear out of nowhere, and people die. George narrowly escape and wanders into a another bizarre situation as the film ends.

Stopping mid-sentence, the film doesn't have an ending. Furthermore, George experiences no growth, or change, after his ordeal. Lucy utters a lot of provocative comments and pseudo-profundities that neither George, nor the audience can figure out. BRIGHT STAR vividly illustrates a theology of total depravity without Christ. This film would have taken a different turn if peppered with a little irresistible grace.